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International Productivity Comparisons Built from the Firm Level

Author

Listed:
  • Martin Neil Baily
  • Robert M. Solow

Abstract

International productivity comparisons can be built up with micro and macro data. Studies of firms or groups of firms producing similar outputs reveal the deeper causes of differences in productivity across countries. The studies find that such differences often depend on patterns of organization within firms, the motivations of managers and the like. The intensity of domestic and international competition can have a large impact on productivity. The case of retailing illustrates the importance of industry evolution. High productivity retailing formats drive out traditional retailers, unless restrained by land-use restrictions or regulations.

Suggested Citation

  • Martin Neil Baily & Robert M. Solow, 2001. "International Productivity Comparisons Built from the Firm Level," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(3), pages 151-172, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:jecper:v:15:y:2001:i:3:p:151-172
    Note: DOI: 10.1257/jep.15.3.151
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/jep.15.3.151
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Steven J. Davis & John C. Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1998. "Job Creation and Destruction," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262540932, January.
    2. Olley, G Steven & Pakes, Ariel, 1996. "The Dynamics of Productivity in the Telecommunications Equipment Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 64(6), pages 1263-1297, November.
    3. Richard E. Baldwin, 1992. "On the Growth Effects of Import Competition," NBER Working Papers 4045, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Manuel Trajtenberg & Adam B. Jaffe & Michael S. Fogarty, 2000. "Knowledge Spillovers and Patent Citations: Evidence from a Survey of Inventors," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 215-218, May.
    5. Susan Helper, 2000. "Economists and Field Research: "You Can Observe a Lot Just by Watching."," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 228-232, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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