IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/adr/anecst/y2001i63-64p131-153.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Motivational Interactions: Effects on Behavior

Author

Listed:
  • Bruno S. Frey
  • Reto Jegen

Abstract

The "Motivation Crowding Effect" suggests that an external intervention via monetary incentives or punishments may undermine (or under different identifiable conditions strengthen) intrinsic motivation. "Crowding-out" and "crowding-in" are empirically relevant phenomena, which can, in specific cases, even dominate the traditional relative price effect. "Crowding effects" may also spread beyond the area and persons initially subject to "crowding-out" and "crowding-in". The paper discusses the conditions under which such a "Motivation Transfer Effect" may obtain.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruno S. Frey & Reto Jegen, 2001. "Motivational Interactions: Effects on Behavior," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 63-64, pages 131-153.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:2001:i:63-64:p:131-153
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20076299
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Loewenstein, George & Price, Joseph & Volpp, Kevin, 2016. "Habit formation in children: Evidence from incentives for healthy eating," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 47-54.
    2. Michèle Belot & Marina Schröder, 2016. "The Spillover Effects of Monitoring: A Field Experiment," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 62(1), pages 37-45, January.
    3. Agnès Festré & Pierre Garrouste & Ankinée Kirakozian & Mira Toumi, 2017. "The Pen Might Be Mightier than the Sword: How Third-party Advice or Sanction Impacts on Pro-environmental Behavior," GREDEG Working Papers 2017-15, Groupe de REcherche en Droit, Economie, Gestion (GREDEG CNRS), University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, revised Aug 2017.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:2001:i:63-64:p:131-153. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Laurent Linnemer). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ensaefr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.