IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/adr/anecst/y1999i55-56p411-427.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Testing Convergence: A Panel Data Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Guillaume Gaulier
  • Christophe Hurlin
  • Philippe Jean-Pierre

Abstract

This paper briefly presents new empirical tests of the convergence hypothesis based on panel data. We apply a modified Evans and Karras [1996] testing procedure to three samples (Europe, OECD and World). We propose a nested tests procedure to characterize various convergence processes: absolute or conditional, with or without a common speed of convergence. In the conditional convergence context, we are particularly concerned with the information included in individual effects. We find evidence supporting the existence of an absolute and common convergence process for per capita GDP in the European Union sample (1960-1990). As concerns the OECD sample, structural disparities imply only a conditional convergence process occurring at country-specific speeds. For our World sample (86 countries) there is no convergence process at all. For OECD countries, a first study of fixed effects is proposed. It shows that only the private and public investment ratios are significantly linked to those unobservable structural disparities.

Suggested Citation

  • Guillaume Gaulier & Christophe Hurlin & Philippe Jean-Pierre, 1999. "Testing Convergence: A Panel Data Approach," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 55-56, pages 411-427.
  • Handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:1999:i:55-56:p:411-427
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/20076205
    Download Restriction: no

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Rodolfo Cermeño, 2002. "Growth convergence clubs: Evidence from Markov-switching models using panel data," 10th International Conference on Panel Data, Berlin, July 5-6, 2002 D5-3, International Conferences on Panel Data.
    2. Abdou-Aziz Niang, 2017. "Testing economic convergence in non-stationary panel," Statistical Methods & Applications, Springer;Società Italiana di Statistica, vol. 26(1), pages 135-156, March.
    3. Thi Kim Cuong Pham & Phu Nguyen Van & Jalal El Ouardighi & Théophile Azomahou, 2006. "Estimation semi-paramétrique de la convergence des régions européennes," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 173(2), pages 97-110.
    4. Angelos Liontakis & Christos T. Papadas & Irene Tzouramani, 2011. "Regional Economic Convergence in Greece: A Stochastic Dominance Approach," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1188, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Dilara Kýlýnç & Ý. Hakan Yetkiner, 2013. "Does Gender Matter for Economic Convergence? The OECD Evidence," Working Papers 1302, Izmir University of Economics.
    6. Christophe Hurlin & Valérie Mignon, 2005. "Une synthèse des tests de racine unitaire sur données de panel," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, vol. 0(3), pages 253-294.
    7. Casto Martín Montero Kuscevic & Marco Antonio del Río Rivera, 2013. "Convergencia en Bolivia: un enfoque espacial con datos de panel dinámicos," REVISTA DE ECONOMÍA DEL ROSARIO, UNIVERSIDAD DEL ROSARIO, August.
    8. Mihaela Simionescu, 2015. "The Impact Of Economic Crisis On Inflation Convergence In The European Union. A Panel Data Approach," Journal Articles, Center For Economic Analyses, pages 37-46, June.
    9. Amjad Naveed & Nisar Ahmad, 2016. "Labour productivity convergence and structural changes: simultaneous analysis at country, regional and industry levels," Journal of Economic Structures, Springer;Pan-Pacific Association of Input-Output Studies (PAPAIOS), vol. 5(1), pages 1-17, December.
    10. Niang, Abdou-Aziz & Pichery, Marie-Claude & Edjo, Marcellin, 2010. "Convergence test in the presence of structural changes: an empirical procedure based on panel data with cross-sectional dependence," MPRA Paper 23452, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Lezheng Liu & Isabel Ruiz, 2006. "Convergence Hypothesis: Evidence from Panel Unit Root Test with Spatial Dependence," REVISTA ECOS DE ECONOMÍA, UNIVERSIDAD EAFIT, October.
    12. Miguel A. Juárez & Mark F. J. Steel, 2010. "Non‐gaussian dynamic bayesian modelling for panel data," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 25(7), pages 1128-1154, November/.
    13. Marie-Eve Mulquin & Katja Senger, 2011. "Interregional transfers and economic convergence of regions," Serie Politique Economique 58, Université de Namur, Centre de Recherches en Economie Regionale et Politique Economique.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:adr:anecst:y:1999:i:55-56:p:411-427. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Laurent Linnemer). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ensaefr.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.