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The Impact of Childhood Health on Adult Labor Market Outcomes

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  • James Smith

    (RAND Corporation)

Abstract

This paper uses some unique data derived from the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics that has followed groups of siblings and their parents for as long as thirty years. Throughout that period, information on education, income, wealth, and health were collected mostly prospectively on all parties. Most important, following siblings from the same family offers a very unique opportunity to control for unmeasured family and other background effects common to children raised in the same family. Using this data, I present estimates that indicate that health conditions during childhood have quantitatively large impacts on virtually all the key adult indicators of socioeconomic status that are used by economists.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/lab/papers/0511/0511001.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Labor and Demography with number 0511001.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 03 Nov 2005
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0511001

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 35
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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  1. Arie Kapteyn & James P. Smith & Arthur van Soest, 2005. "Self-reported Work Disability in the US and The Netherlands," Labor and Demography 0504006, EconWPA.
  2. Joshua Angrist & Alan Krueger, 1998. "Empirical Strategies in Labor Economics," Working Papers 780, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Smith, James P, 1998. "Socioeconomic Status and Health," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 192-96, May.
  4. Douglas Almond & Kenneth Y. Chay & David S. Lee, 2005. "The Costs of Low Birth Weight," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 120(3), pages 1031-1083, August.
  5. Becker, Gary S & Tomes, Nigel, 1976. "Child Endowments and the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages S143-62, August.
  6. Anne Case & Darren Lubotsky & Christina Paxson, 2002. "Economic status and health in childhood: the origins of the gradient," Working Papers 262, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Health and Wellbeing..
  7. James P. Smith, 1999. "Healthy Bodies and Thick Wallets: The Dual Relation between Health and Economic Status," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(2), pages 145-166, Spring.
  8. John Bound & Gary Solon, 1998. "Double Trouble: On the Value of Twins-Based Estimation of the Return to Schooling," NBER Working Papers 6721, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Philip Oreopoulos & Mark Stabile & Randy Walld & Leslie L. Roos, 2008. "Short-, Medium-, and Long-Term Consequences of Poor Infant Health: An Analysis Using Siblings and Twins," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 43(1).
  10. Case, Anne & Fertig, Angela & Paxson, Christina, 2005. "The lasting impact of childhood health and circumstance," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(2), pages 365-389, March.
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  1. Articles for Journal Clubs
    by Liam Delaney in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2010-06-22 17:50:00
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