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Socio-economic characteristics, completed fertility, and the transition from low to high order parities in Mexico

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Author Info

  • Alfonso Miranda

    (University of Warwick)

Abstract

The present paper reports a study on the socio-economic determinants of completed fertility in Mexico. Special attention is given to how socio- economic factors such as religion and ethnic group affect the likelihood of transition from low to high order parities. This methodological approach allows the researcher to enquiry about the role that such socio-economic characteristics have played in the process of adoption and diffusion of a low fertility norm in Mexico. Hurdle Poisson and Negative Binomial count data models are used as main econometric tools. Among other models, an endogenous treatment (or sample selection) count specification is estimated. The findings indicate that Catholicism is associated to reductions on the likelihood of transiting from low to high order parities in Mexico and that broad ethnic group does not affect such a probability. Hence, empirical results suggest that ethnic background does not constitute an obstacle for the diffusion of a low fertility norm (contraception use) in Mexico.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Labor and Demography with number 0308001.

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Date of creation: 10 Aug 2003
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Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpla:0308001

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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

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Keywords: Completed fertility; fertility change; hurdle count models; Mexico;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Alison L. Booth & Hiau Joo Kee, 2009. "Intergenerational Transmission of Fertility Patterns," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 71(2), pages 183-208, 04.
  2. Patrícia Simões & Ricardo Brito Soares, 2012. "Efeitos do programa bolsa família na fecundidade das beneficiárias," Revista Brasileira de Economia, FGV/EPGE Escola Brasileira de Economia e Finanças, Getulio Vargas Foundation (Brazil), vol. 66(4), pages 445-468, December.
  3. Llerena, Freddy, 2012. "Determinantes de la fecundidad en el Ecuador
    [Determinants of fertility in Ecuador]
    ," MPRA Paper 39887, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2012.

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