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Life After Crisis For Labor And Capital in the Era of Neoliberal Globalization

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  • Ozlem Onaran

    ()
    (Vienna University of Economics & B.A.)

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to discuss the outcomes of neoliberal globalization from the perspective of labor in the developing countries, with a particular emphasis on the crises that followed the substantial liberalization in capital accounts in the 1990s. Although a lot has been said about the effects of capital account liberalization on the macroeconomic performance of the economies, less attention is paid to the different effects on labor vs. capital. This paper analyses the outcomes of neoliberal globalization for labor in nine developing countries, and focuses on the episodes of crisis as part of the general class struggle where the question on who will carry the burden of adjustment is a part of the struggle. The paper describes the corner stones of the regime of growth in the neoliberal era, by analyzing the trends in growth, investment, unemployment, and labor’s share in income, and discusses the effects of the shocks generated by crises on these variables. We empirically test whether the lower wage share has had any effect on unemployment, as the neoclassical theory claims, or whether unemployment is primarily driven by the goods market conditions a la Keynes. An empirical analysis about the cyclical behaviour of labor’s share is carried on to understand whether the crises episodes change the effect of demand on distribution. Since the source of growth can also be important on how the generated output is distributed, we also discuss the effects of investment performance on labor’s share. Then we proceed with an analysis of the specific consequences of economic policy choices on distribution, in terms of exchange rate and fiscal policies. Finally we discuss the core stones of an alternative policy framework.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Vienna University of Economics Research Group: Growth and Employment in Europe: Sustainability and Competitiveness in its series Working Papers with number geewp43.

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Date of creation: Dec 2004
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Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwgee:geewp43

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Keywords: Labor’s share; developing countries; crisis; neoliberal policies; globalization;

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References

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  1. Dollar, David & Kraay, Aart, 2001. "Trade, growth, and poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2615, The World Bank.
  2. Dorothy Power & Gerald Epstein, 2003. "Rentier Incomes and Financial Crises: An Empirical Examination of Trends and Cycles in Some OECD Countries," Working Papers wp57, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  3. James Crotty & Kang-Kook Lee, 2002. "A political-economic analysis of the failure of neo-liberal restructuring in post-crisis Korea," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(5), pages 667-678, September.
  4. Bosch, Gerhard & Lehndorff, Steffen, 2001. "Working-Time Reduction and Employment: Experiences in Europe and Economic Policy Recommendations," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 25(2), pages 209-43, March.
  5. Yïlmaz AKYÜZ, 2000. "The Debate On The International Financial Architecture: Reforming The Reformers," UNCTAD Discussion Papers 148, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
  6. Philip Arestis, 2002. "Financial crisis in Southeast Asia: dispelling illusion the Minskyan way," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 26(2), pages 237-260, March.
  7. Peter R. Fallon & Robert E. B. Lucas, 2000. "The Impact of Financial Crises on Labor Markets, Household Incomes and Poverty: A Review of Evidence," Boston University - Institute for Economic Development 103, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development.
  8. Gary Dymski & James Crotty, 2000. "Can the Global Neoliberal Regime Survive Victory in Asia? The Political Economy of the Asian Crisis," Published Studies ps5, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  9. Kang-Kook Lee & James Crotty, 2004. "Was the IMF's Imposition of Economic Regime Change Justified? A Critique of the IMF's Economic and Political Role in Korea During and After the Crisis," Working Papers wp77, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  10. �Zlem Onaran & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2005. "Two Different Export-Oriented Growth Strategies: Accumulation and Distribution in Turkey and South Korea," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 41(1), pages 65-89, January.
  11. James Crotty, 2000. "Structural Contradictions of the Global Neoliberal Regime," Published Studies ps6, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  12. Harrison, Ann, 2005. "Has Globalization Eroded Labor’s Share? Some Cross-Country Evidence," MPRA Paper 39649, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Gerardo Angeles-Castro, 2006. "The Relationship Between Economic Growth and Inequality: Evidence from the Age of Market Liberalism," Studies in Economics 0601, Department of Economics, University of Kent.
  2. Özlem Onaran & Nursel Aydiner-Avsar, 2006. "The controversy over employment policy: Low labor costs and openness, or demand policy? A sectoral analysis for Turkey," Department of Economics Working Papers wuwp097, Vienna University of Economics, Department of Economics.
  3. Angeles-Castro, Gerardo, 2006. "The relationship between economic growth and inequality: evidence from the age of market liberalism," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2006 2, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
  4. Onaran, Ozlem & Stockhammer, Engelbert, 2008. "The effect of FDI and foreign trade on wages in the Central and Eastern European Countries in the post-transition era: A sectoral analysis for the manufacturing industry," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1), pages 66-80, March.
  5. Luciano Boggio & Vincenzo Dall'Aglio & Marco Magnani, 2009. "On Labour Shares in Recent Decades: A Survey," DISCE - Quaderni dell'Istituto di Teoria Economica e Metodi Quantitativi itemq0957, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Dipartimenti e Istituti di Scienze Economiche (DISCE).
  6. Gerardo Angeles-Castro, 2006. "The relationship between economic growth and inequality: evidence from the age of market liberalism," DEGIT Conference Papers c011_009, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.

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