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Potential applications of conditional cash transfers for prevention of sexually transmitted infections and HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa

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  • Medlin, Carol
  • de Walque, Damien

Abstract

A growing number of developing countries have introduced conditional cash transfer programs that provide money to poor families with certain contingencies attached - such as requiring school attendance or regular immunization and health check-ups. As the popularity of conditional cash transfer programs has grown, experimentation with potential applications in other areas of health, such as sexual and reproductive health, and HIV prevention, in particular, has also increased. Evaluations of conditional cash transfer programs have focused almost exclusively on uptake of health and educational services, which make relatively low demands of participants compared with more complex interventions, which require the cessation of risky behaviors, such as smoking, obesity, and substance abuse. The literature on contingency management - based on the principle that behavioral change occurs when appropriate behaviors are reinforced and rewarded - provides a richer picture of the complexity of the use of conditionality to encourage healthy behavioral change. This paper examines developing countries'experiences with conditional cash transfer programs and the results of trials in clinical settings on the efficacy of contingency management, and addresses their relevance for designing conditional cash transfer programs to address risky sexual behavior and promote the prevention of sexually transmitted infections and HIV in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4673.

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Date of creation: 01 Jul 2008
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4673

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Keywords: Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Population Policies; Adolescent Health; Disease Control&Prevention; HIV AIDS;

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References

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  1. Laura B. Rawlings, 2005. "Evaluating the Impact of Conditional Cash Transfer Programs," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 29-55.
  2. Ted O’Donoghue & Matthew Rabin, 2001. "Risky Behavior among Youths: Some Issues from Behavioral Economics," NBER Chapters, in: Risky Behavior among Youths: An Economic Analysis, pages 29-68 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Schady, Norbert & Rosero, Jose, 2007. "Are cash transfers made to women spent like other sources of income?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4282, The World Bank.
  4. Paul Gertler, 2004. "Do Conditional Cash Transfers Improve Child Health? Evidence from PROGRESA's Control Randomized Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 336-341, May.
  5. Nanak Kakwani & Fabio Veras Soares & Hyun H. Son, 2005. "Conditional cash transfers in African countries," Working Papers 9, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.
  6. Ariel Fiszbein & Norbert Schady & Francisco H. G. Ferreira & Margaret Grosh & Niall Keleher & Pedro Olinto & Emmanuel Skoufias, 2009. "Conditional Cash Transfers : Reducing Present and Future Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2597, October.
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Cited by:
  1. de Walque, Damien & Dow, William H. & Medlin, Carol & Nathan, Rose, 2012. "Stimulating demand for AIDS prevention : lessons from the RESPECT trial," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5973, The World Bank.
  2. Schultz Hansen, Kristian & Hjernø Lesner, Tine & Østerdal, Lars Peter, 2013. "Incentivising appropriate malaria treatment-seeking behaviour with price subsidies," COHERE Working Paper 2013:8, COHERE - Centre of Health Economics Research, University of Southern Denmark.

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