Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Migration pressures and immigration policies : new evidence on the selection of migrants

Contents:

Author Info

  • Avato, Johanna
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper aims to better understand emigration pressures in migrant sending countries by looking at the determinants of the propensity to migrate at the individual level. The analysis is based on survey data from Albania, Moldova, Egypt and Tunisia collected by the European Training Foundation (ETF) in 2006. Within this context the study focuses on: (i) the self-selection of migrants in terms of skills; and (ii) the impact of selective immigration policies on the migration process. The paper finds that migration pressures, or the intent to migrate, are not subject to any self-selection. However, immigration policies exert a strong out-selection that is likely part of the reasons why positive selection is found in many studies. Further, the study confirms that the European Union (EU) attracts comparatively lower skilled migrants than other destinations.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://www-wds.worldbank.org/servlet/WDSContentServer/WDSP/IB/2009/12/31/000334955_20091231061840/Rendered/PDF/524490NWP0Box345558B01PUBLIC100930.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Social Protection Discussion Papers with number 52449.

    as in new window
    Length:
    Date of creation: 01 Dec 2009
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:hdnspu:52449

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
    Phone: (202) 477-1234
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.worldbank.org/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: Population Policies; Voluntary and Involuntary Resettlement; Human Migrations&Resettlements; International Migration; Gender and Development;

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Timothy Hatton & Jeffery Williamson, 2002. "What Fundamentals Drive World Migration?," CEPR Discussion Papers 458, Centre for Economic Policy Research, Research School of Economics, Australian National University.
    2. John Knight & Lina Song, 2003. "Chinese Peasant Choices: Migration, Rural Industry or Farming," Oxford Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(2), pages 123-148.
    3. Katz, Eliakim & Stark, Oded, 1986. "Labor Migration and Risk Aversion in Less Developed Countries," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 4(1), pages 134-49, January.
    4. Stephen Drinkwater, 2003. "Go West? Assessing the willingness to move from Central and Eastern European Countries," School of Economics Discussion Papers 0503, School of Economics, University of Surrey.
    5. Paul Winters & Alain de Janvry & Elisabeth Sadoulet, 2001. "Family and Community Networks in Mexico-U.S. Migration," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(1), pages 159-184.
    6. McKenzie, David & Gibson, John & Stillman, Steven, 2013. "A land of milk and honey with streets paved with gold: Do emigrants have over-optimistic expectations about incomes abroad?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 116-127.
    7. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2001. "Self-selection among undocumented immigrants from Mexico," Working Paper 2001-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    8. Danzer, Alexander M. & Dietz, Barbara, 2008. "Economic Migration, Networks and Human Capital Transferability from the New European Borderlands. A Comparison of Five Eastern European Countries," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Zurich 2008 7, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.
    9. Adriana Castaldo & Julie Litchfield & Barry Reilly, 2007. "Who Is Most Likely to Migrate from Albania?: Evidence from the Albania Living Standards Measurement Survey," Eastern European Economics, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 45(5), pages 69-94, September.
    10. Parsons, Christopher R. & Skeldon, Ronald & Walmsley, Terrie L. & Winters, L. Alan, 2007. "Quantifying international migration : a database of bilateral migrant stocks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4165, The World Bank.
    11. Hendrik P. van Dalen & George Groenewold & Jeanette J. Schoorl, 2003. "Out of Africa: What drives the Pressure to emigrate?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-059/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    12. Hendrik P. van Dalen & George Groenewold & Tineke Fokkema, 2005. "Remittances and their Effect on Emigration Intentions in Egypt, Morocco and Turkey," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 05-030/1, Tinbergen Institute.
    13. Hendrik P. van Dalen & George Groenewold & Jeanette J. Schoorl, 2003. "Out of Africa: What drives the Pressure to emigrate?," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 03-059/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Michael Clemens, 2014. "A Case against Taxes and Quotas on High-Skill Emigration - Working Paper 363," Working Papers 363, Center for Global Development.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wbk:hdnspu:52449. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Raiden C. Dillard).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.