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Household vulnerability and children's activities : information needed from household surveys to measure their relationship

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  • Steele, Diane
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    Abstract

    Studies that have been done on the relationships between poverty, vulnerability, risks and children's activities have shown that child work may not always be a consequence of poverty, and that some aspects of vulnerability may be more important in determining whether children work or not vis a vis others. In order to analyze the relationships between vulnerability, risk, and children's activities, both quantitative and qualitative information is needed. Information on vulnerability cannot be measured directly. It is not possible to simply ask a household whether or not it is vulnerable. It must be measured through proxies such as tangible assets (land, labor capital, and savings), and intangible assets (social capital, proximity to markets, health and education facilities, and empowerment). Measurement of children's activities, and especially those that would encompass child labor, include many characteristics, other than just the activities that children perform. It is also necessary to collect information on characteristics of other members of the household, especially the parents, and characteristics of the community in which the child lives. This paper provides an overview of the information needed to measure both household vulnerability, and children's activities using household surveys. Explanations of key concepts are included, and examples of questions to include in household surveys are provided. It also provides information on how to adapt existing household questionnaires, problems that may be encountered if changes are implemented and basic information on the administration of household surveys.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Social Protection Discussion Papers with number 32748.

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    Date of creation: 01 May 2005
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    Handle: RePEc:wbk:hdnspu:32748

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    1. Siegel, Paul B. & Alwang, Jeffrey, 1999. "An asset-based approach to social risk management : a conceptual framework," Social Protection Discussion Papers 21324, The World Bank.
    2. Canagarajah, Sudharshan & Nielsen, Helena Skyt, 1999. "Child labor and schooling in Africa : a comparative study," Social Protection Discussion Papers 20456, The World Bank.
    3. Bhalotra, Sonia & Heady, Christopher, 2001. "Child farm labour : the wealth paradox," Social Protection Discussion Papers 24088, The World Bank.
    4. Paul Mosley & Robert Holzmann & Steen Jorgensen, 1999. "Social protection as social risk management: conceptual underpinnings for the social protection sector strategy paper," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(7), pages 1005-1027.
    5. Guarcelllo, Lorenzo & Mealli, Fabrizia & Rosati, Furio Camillo, 2003. "Household vulnerability and child labor : the effect of shocks, credit rationing and insurance," Social Protection Discussion Papers 29136, The World Bank.
    6. Levine, Anthony [editor] & Doryan, Eduardo & Hunter, Susan & Subbarao, Kalanidhi & Walker, Christopher & Lukoda, Matthew & Assefaw Tekeste Ghebrekidan & Baingana, Florence & Macleon, Heather & Frederi, 2001. "Orphans and other vulnerable children : what role for social protection ?," Social Protection Discussion Papers 24089, The World Bank.
    7. Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Beegle, Kathleen & Gatti, Roberta, 2003. "Child labor, income shocks, and access to credit," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3075, The World Bank.
    8. Ucw, 2008. "Understanding children's work in Uganda," UCW Country Studies 9, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
    9. Robert Holzmann & Steen Jorgensen, 2000. "Social risk management : a new conceptual framework for social protection and beyond," Social Protection Discussion Papers 21314, The World Bank.
    10. Margaret Grosh & Paul Glewwe, 2000. "Designing Household Survey Questionnaires for Developing Countries : Lessons from 15 Years of the Living Standards Measurement Study, Volume 3," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15195, October.
    11. Grimsrud, Bjorne, 2001. "Measuring and analyzing child labor : methodological issues," Social Protection Discussion Papers 23029, The World Bank.
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