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Ideology, Government, and the American Dilemma

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  • Robert A. Margo

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Vanderbilt University)

Abstract

This essay, written in honor of the economic historian Robert Higgs, surveys the economic history of African Americans from the end of slavery to the present day. This history, I argue, was largely one of convergence. However, convergence was not continuous but, rather, was punctuated by discontinuous changes in relative black status. Both ideology B prevailing views about race B and government played key roles in making change discontinuous.

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File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/pubs/VUECON/vu04-w11.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Vanderbilt University Department of Economics in its series Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers with number 0411.

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Date of creation: Jan 2004
Date of revision: May 2004
Handle: RePEc:van:wpaper:0411

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Web page: http://www.vanderbilt.edu/econ/wparchive/index.html

Related research

Keywords: Racial Discrimination; Civil Rights Movement; Slavery; Institutional Change;

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  1. John J. Donohue III & James Heckman, 1991. "Continuous Versus Episodic Change: The Impact of Civil Rights Policy on the Economic Status of Blacks," NBER Working Papers 3894, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. James J. Heckman & Brook S. Payner, 1989. "Determining the Impact of Federal Antidiscrimination Policy on the Economic Status of Blacks: A Study of South Carolina," NBER Working Papers 2854, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. repec:cup:jechis:v:57:y:1997:i:03:p:607-632_01 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Robert A. Margo, 2002. "The North-South Wage Gap, Before and After the Civil War," NBER Working Papers 8778, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Margo, Robert A, 1991. "Segregated Schools and the Mobility Hypothesis: A Model of Local Government Discrimination," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 106(1), pages 61-73, February.
  6. William J. Collins, 2001. "Race, Roosevelt, and Wartime Production: Fair Employment in World War II Labor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 272-286, March.
  7. Blau, Francine D & Graham, John W, 1990. "Black-White Differences in Wealth and Asset Composition," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 105(2), pages 321-39, May.
  8. Goldin, Claudia & Margo, Robert A, 1992. "The Great Compression: The Wage Structure in the United States at Mid-century," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 107(1), pages 1-34, February.
  9. Higgs, Robert, 1982. "Accumulation of Property by Southern Blacks before World War I," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 72(4), pages 725-37, September.
  10. Margo, Robert A, 1984. "Accumulation of Property by Southern Blacks before World War I: Comment and Further Evidence," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 74(4), pages 768-76, September.
  11. Edward N. Wolff, 1998. "Recent Trends in the Size Distribution of Household Wealth," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 131-150, Summer.
  12. Collins, Wiiliam J., 1997. "When the Tide Turned: Immigration and the Delay of the Great Black Migration," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(03), pages 607-632, September.
  13. Fogel, Robert W & Engerman, Stanley L, 1977. "Explaining the Relative Efficiency of Slave Agriculture in the Antebellum South," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 275-96, June.
  14. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser, 1995. "Are Ghettos Good or Bad?," NBER Working Papers 5163, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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