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Does current demographic policy in Russia impact on fertility of different educational groups?

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Author Info

  • Irina Kalabikhina

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Lomonosov Moscow State University)

  • Alla Tyndik

    ()
    (Institute for Social Analysis and Prediction RANEPA)

Abstract

This article is devoted to investigation current demographic policy in Russia impact on fertility of different educational groups. Authors use qualitative and quantitative data. Quantitative data for this analysis come from the Gender and Generation Survey in Russia (2004, 2007, 2011 waves). Semi-structured interview method (Moscow, 2010) was used to assess the cognitive and emotional aspects of fertility behaviour (to give birth the next child). One of the important results of this study that Russian population could not be satisfated with current demographic policy. Moreover, higher educated people have stronger demand for family-work measures to reach desired family size. People with higher education estimate influence of existing measures lower as a whole, but influence of potential measures (directed on combination of career and parenthood) the estimated higher.

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File URL: http://www.econ.msu.ru/ext/lib/Category/x1a/xb1/6833/file/0010.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Moscow State University, Faculty of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0010.

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Length: 14 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:upa:wpaper:0010

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Keywords: Demographic policy; fertility; educational groups; Russia;

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  1. Claudia Goldin, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women's Employment, Education, and Family," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 1-21, May.
  2. Stephan Klasen & Andrey Launov, 2006. "Analysis of the determinants of fertility decline in the Czech Republic," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 25-54, February.
  3. Goldin, Claudia, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women’s Employment, Education, and Family," Scholarly Articles 2943933, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  4. Brienna Perelli-Harris, 2008. "Ukraine: On the border between old and new in uncertain times," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(29), pages 1145-1178, July.
  5. Alicia Adsera, 2006. "An Economic Analysis of the Gap Between Desired and Actual Fertility: The Case of Spain," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 75-95, 03.
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