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Why Are Ghettos Bad? Examining the Role of the Metropolitan Educational Environment

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Author Info

  • Robert Bifulco

    (Syracuse University)

  • Delia Furtado

    (University of Connecticut)

  • Stephen L. Ross

    (University of Connecticut)

Abstract

Relative to whites, blacks that reside in highly segregated metropolitan areas have worse educational and labor market outcomes than those that reside in less segregated areas. Using data from the 1990 U.S. Census combined with measures of metropolitan educational environment created from the Common Core of Data (CCD), we test whether the strong empirical relationship between residential segregation and black outcomes can be attributed to the educational environment in those metropolitan areas. We find that our measures of metropolitan educational environment can explain a substantial fraction of the effect of segregation on educational outcomes and idleness.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Connecticut, Department of Economics in its series Working papers with number 2009-30.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uct:uconnp:2009-30

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Postal: University of Connecticut 341 Mansfield Road, Unit 1063 Storrs, CT 06269-1063
Phone: (860) 486-4889
Fax: (860) 486-4463
Web page: http://www.econ.uconn.edu/
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Keywords: Racial Segregation; School Segregation; Neighborhood Effects; Peer Effects;

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References

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  1. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jacob L. Vigdor, 1999. "The Rise and Decline of the American Ghetto," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 107(3), pages 455-506, June.
  2. Collins, William J. & Margo, Robert A., 2000. "Residential segregation and socioeconomic outcomes: When did ghettos go bad?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 69(2), pages 239-243, November.
  3. Card, David & Rothstein, Jesse, 2007. "Racial segregation and the black-white test score gap," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(11-12), pages 2158-2184, December.
  4. Alan B. Krueger, 1997. "Experimental Estimates of Education Production Functions," NBER Working Papers 6051, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Caroline Hoxby, 2000. "Peer Effects in the Classroom: Learning from Gender and Race Variation," NBER Working Papers 7867, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Jonathan Guryan, 2004. "Desegregation and Black Dropout Rates," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 919-943, September.
  7. Eric A. Hanushek & John F. Kain & Steven G. Rivkin, 2009. "New Evidence about Brown v. Board of Education: The Complex Effects of School Racial Composition on Achievement," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(3), pages 349-383, 07.
  8. Cutler, David M & Glaeser, Edward L, 1997. "Are Ghettos Good or Bad?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(3), pages 827-72, August.
  9. Jacob L. Vigdor, 2002. "Locations, Outcomes, and Selective Migration," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(4), pages 751-755, November.
  10. Charles T. Clotfelter & Helen F. Ladd & Jacob L. Vigdor, 2006. "Teacher-Student Matching and the Assessment of Teacher Effectiveness," NBER Working Papers 11936, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Robert Bifulco & Jason Fletcher & Stephen Ross, 2008. "The Effect of Classmate Characteristics on Individual Outcomes: Evidence from the Add Health," Working papers 2008-21, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2009.
  12. Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat, 2007. "The Wrong Side(s) of the Tracks Estimating the Causal Effects of Racial Segregation on City Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 13343, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. C. Kirabo Jackson, 2009. "Student Demographics, Teacher Sorting, and Teacher Quality: Evidence from the End of School Desegregation," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 27(2), pages 213-256, 04.
  14. Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat & Ebonya L. Washington, 2007. "Segregation and Black Political Efficacy," NBER Working Papers 13606, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Stephen L. Ross, 2009. "Social Interactions within Cities: Neighborhood Environments and Peer Relationships," Working papers 2009-31, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.

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