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Student Demographics, Teacher Sorting, and Teacher Quality: Evidence from the End of School Desegregation

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  • C. Kirabo Jackson

Abstract

The reshuffling of students due to the end of student busing in Charlotte-Mecklenburg provides a unique opportunity to investigate the relationship between changes in student attributes and changes in teacher quality that are not confounded with changes in school or neighborhood characteristics. Comparisons of ordinary least squares and instrumental variable results suggest that spatial correlation between teachers' residences, students' residences, and schools could lead to spurious correlation between student attributes and teacher characteristics. Schools that experienced a repatriation of black students experienced a decrease in various measures of teacher quality. I provide evidence that this was primarily due to changes in labor supply. (c) 2009 by The University of Chicago.

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File URL: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/pdf/10.1086/599334
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 27 (2009)
Issue (Month): 2 (04)
Pages: 213-256

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:27:y:2009:i:2:p:213-256

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Cited by:
  1. C. Kirabo Jackson, 2011. "School Competition and Teacher Labor Markets: Evidence from Charter School Entry in North Carolina," NBER Working Papers 17225, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. C. Kirabo Jackson & Emily Greene Owens, 2010. "One for the Road: Public Transportation, Alcohol Consumption, and Intoxicated Driving," NBER Working Papers 15872, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Fernando Albornoz & Samuel Berlinski & Antonio Cabrales, 2010. "Incentives, resources and the organization of the school system," Working Papers 2010-28, FEDEA.
  4. Jackson, C. Kirabo, 2013. "Can higher-achieving peers explain the benefits to attending selective schools? Evidence from Trinidad and Tobago," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 108(C), pages 63-77.
  5. Gregorio Caetano & Vikram Maheshri, 2013. "School Segregation and the Identification of Tipping Behavior," Working Papers 2013-252-50, Department of Economics, University of Houston.
  6. Robert Bifulco & Delia Furtado & Stephen L. Ross, 2009. "Why Are Ghettos Bad? Examining the Role of the Metropolitan Educational Environment," Working papers 2009-30, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
  7. Goldhaber, Dan & Destler, Katharine & Player, Daniel, 2010. "Teacher labor markets and the perils of using hedonics to estimate compensating differentials in the public sector," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 1-17, February.
  8. C. Kirabo Jackson, 2011. "Single-Sex Schools, Student Achievement, and Course Selection: Evidence from Rule-Based Student Assignments in Trinidad and Tobago," NBER Working Papers 16817, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Dieterle, Steven G. & Guarino, Cassandra & Reckase, Mark D. & Wooldridge, Jeffrey M., 2012. "How do Principals Assign Students to Teachers? Finding Evidence in Administrative Data and the Implications for Value-added," IZA Discussion Papers 7112, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  10. Conrad Miller, 2009. "Teacher Sorting and Own-Race Teacher Effects in Elementary School," Discussion Papers 08-036, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
  11. C. Kirabo Jackson & Elias Bruegmann, 2009. "Teaching Students and Teaching Each Other: The Importance of Peer Learning for Teachers," NBER Working Papers 15202, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. C. Kirabo Jackson, 2012. "Teacher Quality at the High-School Level: The Importance of Accounting for Tracks," NBER Working Papers 17722, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Gilpin, Gregory A., 2012. "Teacher salaries and teacher aptitude: An analysis using quantile regressions," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 15-29.
  14. Strain, Michael R., 2013. "Single-sex classes & student outcomes: Evidence from North Carolina," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 73-87.
  15. Rockoff, Jonah E. & Speroni, Cecilia, 2011. "Subjective and objective evaluations of teacher effectiveness: Evidence from New York City," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 687-696, October.
  16. Steven Glazerman & Jeffrey Max, 2011. "Do Low-Income Students have Equal Access to the Highest-Performing Teachers?," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 6956, Mathematica Policy Research.

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