Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The Rebound Effect: Some Questions Answered

Contents:

Author Info

  • Janine De Fence

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Strathclyde)

  • Maggie Koerth-Baker

    ()
    (Freelance Writer and Editor, Wiley & Sons.)

  • Karen Turner

    ()
    (Division of Economics, University of Stirling)

  • Cathy Xin Cui

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Strathclyde.)

Abstract

Greenhouse gas (and other pollutant) emissions from energy use are now taken to be a problem both internationally and for individual national and regional governments. A number of mechanisms are being employed to reduce energy consumption demand as part of climate and energy policies internationally. A central policy focus is increased efficiency in the use of energy. However, the straightforward link between increased energy efficiency and reduced energy consumption has been questioned. This is due to the notion of the ‘rebound effect’. Rebound occurs when improvements in energy efficiency actually stimulate the direct and indirect demand for energy in production and/or consumption. It is triggered by the fact that an increase in the efficiency in the use of energy acts to reduce the implicit price of energy, or the price of effective energy services for each physical unit of energy used. Thus, it is an economic phenomenon. The rebound effect implies that measures taken to reduce energy use might lead to increases in carbon emissions, or at least not offset them to the extent anticipated. It is possible to distiguish between direct rebound effects in energy consumption in the activity where energy efficiency has increased, indirect rebound effects from income and substitutuion effects and economy-wide rebound effects (impacts on macro-level energy use). This paper attempts to provide a non-technical overview of work on the latter, carried out under an ESRC-funded project investigating the source and magnitude of econom-wide rebound effects from increased energy efficiency in the UK.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.strath.ac.uk/media/departments/economics/researchdiscussionpapers/2011/11-07_final.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1107.

as in new window
Length: 22 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:str:wpaper:1107

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Sir William Duncan Building, 130 Rottenrow, Glasgow G4 0GE
Phone: +44 (0)141 548 3842
Fax: +44 (0)141 548 4445
Email:
Web page: http://www.strath.ac.uk/economics/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: General equilibrium; energy efficiency; rebound effects; disinvestment.;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:str:wpaper:1107. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Kirsty Hall).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.