Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Cost-Effective Reduction of NOx Emissions from Electricity Generation

Contents:

Author Info

  • Burtraw, Dallas

    ()
    (Resources for the Future)

  • Palmer, Karen

    ()
    (Resources for the Future)

  • Bharvirkar, Ranjit
  • Paul, Anthony

Abstract

This paper analyzes the benefits and costs of policies to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions from electricity generation in the United States. Because emissions of NOx contribute to the high concentration of atmospheric ozone in the eastern states that is associated with health hazards, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has called on eastern states to formulate state implementation plans (SIPs) for reducing NOx emissions. Our analysis considers three NOx reduction scenarios: a summer seasonal cap in the eastern states covered by EPA’s NOx SIP Call, an annual cap in the same SIP Call region, and a national annual cap. All scenarios allow for emissions trading. Although EPA’s current policy is to implement a seasonal cap in the SIP Call region, this analysis indicates that an annual cap in the SIP Call region would yield about 400 million dollars more in net benefits (benefits less costs) than would a seasonal policy, based on particulate-related health effects only. An annual cap in the SIP Call region is also the policy that is most likely to achieve benefits in excess of costs. Consideration of omissions from this accounting, including the potential benefits from reductions in ozone concentrations, strengthens the finding that an annual program offers greater net benefits than a seasonal program.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.rff.org/RFF/documents/RFF-DP-00-55-REV.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Resources For the Future in its series Discussion Papers with number dp-00-55-rev.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 01 Jan 2001
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-00-55-rev

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.rff.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: emissions trading; electricity; particulates; nitrogen oxides; NO x; health benefits;

Find related papers by JEL classification:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Banzhaf, H. Spencer & Desvousges, William H. & Johnson, F. Reed, 1996. "Assessing the externalities of electricity generation in the Midwest," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 395-421, December.
  2. Krupnick, Alan J. & Burtraw, Dallas, 1996. "The social costs of electricity: Do the numbers add up?," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 423-466, December.
  3. Anna Alberini & Maureen Cropper & Alan Krupnick & Nathalie B. Simon, 2004. "Willingness to Pay for Mortality Risk Reductions: Does Latency Matter?," NCEE Working Paper Series 200401, National Center for Environmental Economics, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, revised Feb 2004.
  4. Dallas Burtraw & Alan Krupnick & Erin Mansur & David Austin & Deirdre Farrell, 1998. "Costs And Benefits Of Reducing Air Pollutants Related To Acid Rain," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 16(4), pages 379-400, October.
  5. Williams, Roberton III, 2002. "Environmental Tax Interactions when Pollution Affects Health or Productivity," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 261-270, September.
  6. Krupnick, Alan, et al, 2002. " Age, Health and the Willingness to Pay for Mortality Risk Reductions: A Contingent Valuation Survey of Ontario Residents," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 161-86, March.
  7. Burtraw, Dallas & Palmer, Karen & Bharvirkar, Ranjit & Paul, Anthony, 2001. "Restructuring and Cost of Reducing NOx Emissions in Electricity Generation," Discussion Papers dp-01-10-rev, Resources For the Future.
  8. Krupnick, Alan & McConnell, Virginia & Stoessell, Terrell & Cannon, Matthew & Batz, Michael, 2000. "Cost-Effective NOx Control in the Eastern United States," Discussion Papers dp-00-18, Resources For the Future.
  9. Rowe, Robert D. & Lang, Carolyn M. & Chestnut, Lauraine G., 1996. "Critical factors in computing externalities for electricity resources," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(4), pages 363-394, December.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Spencer Banzhaf, H. & Burtraw, Dallas & Palmer, Karen, 2004. "Efficient emission fees in the US electricity sector," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 317-341, September.
  2. Denise L. Mauzeral & Babar Sultan & Namsoug Kim & David F. Bradford, 2004. "Charging NOx Emitters for Health Damages: An Exploratory Analysis," Working Papers 99, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
  3. Jaeger, William K. & Egelkraut, Thorsten M., 2011. "Biofuel economics in a setting of multiple objectives and unintended consequences," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 15(9), pages 4320-4333.
  4. Parry, Ian W. H., 2004. "Are emissions permits regressive?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 364-387, March.
  5. Denise L. Mauzerall & Babar Sultan & Namsoug Kim & David Bradford, 2005. "Charging NO x Emitters for Health Damages: An Exploratory Analysis," CESifo Working Paper Series 1442, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Ian W.H. Parry, 2005. "Fiscal Interactions and the Costs of Controlling Pollution from Electricity," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 36(4), pages 849-869, Winter.
  7. Timothy Brennan & Karen Palmer & Salvador Martinez, 2002. "Implementing Electricity Restructuring," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 22(1), pages 99-132, June.
  8. Burtraw, Dallas & Palmer, Karen, 2005. "The Environmental Impacts of Electricity Restructuring: Looking Back and Looking Forward," Discussion Papers dp-05-07, Resources For the Future.
  9. Burtraw, Dallas & Szambelan, Sarah Jo, 2009. "U.S. Emissions Trading Markets for SO2 and NOx," Discussion Papers dp-09-40, Resources For the Future.
  10. Palmer, Karen & Brennan, Timothy & Martinez, Salvador, 2001. "Implementing Electricity Restructuring: Policies, Potholes, and Prospects," Discussion Papers dp-01-62-, Resources For the Future.
  11. Burtraw, Dallas & Bharvirkar, Ranjit & Bloyd, Cary, 2002. "Investment in Electricity Transmission and Ancillary Environmental Benefits," Discussion Papers dp-02-14-, Resources For the Future.
  12. Rezek, Jon P. & Campbell, Randall C., 2007. "Cost estimates for multiple pollutants: A maximum entropy approach," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 503-519, May.
  13. Burtraw, Dallas & Palmer, Karen & Bharvirkar, Ranjit & Paul, Anthony, 2001. "The Effect of Allowance Allocation on the Cost of Carbon Emission Trading," Discussion Papers dp-01-30-, Resources For the Future.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rff:dpaper:dp-00-55-rev. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Webmaster).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.