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Where there is a will: Fertility behavior and sex bias in large families

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  • Jain, Tarun

Abstract

Boys and girls in India experience large dierences in survival and health outcomes. For example, the 2001 Census reports that the sex ratio for children under six years of age is 927 girls per thousand boys, an outcome that has been attributed to differences in parents’ behavior towards their sons and daughters. Most studies rely primarily on cultural factors or biases in economic returns to explain these differences. In this paper, I propose an explanation where bequest motives drive fertility behavior that generates sex-based differences in outcomes even when parents do not explicitly prefer boys over girls. In India’s patrilocal rural society, women do not inherit property and heads of joint families aim to retain assets within the family lineage for future generations. I hypothesize that this leads heads to bequeath more land to claimants with more sons, in turn generating a race for sons among adult brothers seeking to maximize their inheritance of agricultural land. I confirm this theoretical prediction using panel data from rural households in India. This strategic fertility behavior implies that girls have systematically more siblings compared to boys, and hence receive smaller shares of household resources, offering an explanation for sex-based dierences in outcomes.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 16835.

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Date of creation: 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:16835

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Keywords: Strategic bequests. Joint family. Fertility choice. Gender discrimination. Sex ratio.;

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  1. Das Gupta, Monica, 1999. "Lifeboat versus corporate ethic: social and demographic implications of stem and joint families," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 173-184, July.
  2. Maristella Botticini & Aloysius Siow, 1999. "Why Dowries?," Boston University - Institute for Economic Development, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development 95, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development.
  3. Chiappori, P.A., 1989. "Collective Labour Supply and Welfare," DELTA Working Papers, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure) 89-07, DELTA (Ecole normale supérieure).
  4. Shleifer, Andrei & Summers, Lawrence H. & Bernheim, B. Douglas, 1986. "The Strategic Bequest Motive," Scholarly Articles 3721794, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  5. Bhargava, Alok, 2003. "Family planning, gender differences and infant mortality: evidence from Uttar Pradesh, India," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 112(1), pages 225-240, January.
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  7. Deininger, Klaus W. & Jin, Songqing & Nagarajan, Hari K., 2007. "Determinants and Consequences of Land Sales Market Participation: Panel Evidence from India," 2007 Annual Meeting, July 29-August 1, 2007, Portland, Oregon TN, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) 9824, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  8. Jayachandran, Seema & Kuziemko, Ilyana, 2009. "Why Do Mothers Breastfeed Girls Less Than Boys? Evidence and Implications for Child Health in India," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 7321, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. T. Schultz, 1972. "Retrospective evidence of a decline of fertility and child mortality in Bangladesh," Demography, Springer, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 415-430, August.
  10. Mearns, Robin, 1999. "Access to land in rural India - policy issues and options," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2123, The World Bank.
  11. Gangadharan, L. & Maitra, P., 1999. "Testing for Son Preference in South Africa," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series, The University of Melbourne 724, The University of Melbourne.
  12. Andrew D. Foster & Mark R. Rosenzweig, 2002. "Household Division and Rural Economic Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 69(4), pages 839-869.
  13. Das Gupta, Monica, 1999. "Lifeboat ethics versus corporate ethics - social and demographic implications of stem and joint families," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2127, The World Bank.
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