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The Determinants of Rising Inequality in Health Insurance and Wages, Second Version

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  • Rong Hai

    ()
    (Becker Friedman Institute for Research in Economics, University of Chicago)

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Abstract

What has caused the rising gap in health insurance coverage by education in the U.S. over the last thirty years? How does the employment-based health insurance market interact with the labor market? What are the effects of social insurance such as Medicaid? By developing and structurally estimating an equilibrium model, I find that the interaction between labor market technological changes and the cost growth of medical services explains 60% to 70% of the gap. Using counterfactual experiments, I also evaluate the impact of further Medicaid eligibility expansion and employer mandates introduced in the Affordable Care Act on labor and health insurance markets.

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Paper provided by Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania in its series PIER Working Paper Archive with number 13-071.

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Length: 70 pages
Date of creation: 16 Jan 2013
Date of revision: 21 Dec 2013
Handle: RePEc:pen:papers:13-071

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Keywords: Inequality; Human Capital; Health Insurance; Health Care Reform; Labor Market Equilibrium;

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  1. Pashchenko, Svetlana & Porapakkarm, Ponpoje, 2012. "Quantitative analysis of health insurance reform: separating regulation from redistribution," MPRA Paper 41193, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Eric French & John Bailey Jones, 2004. "On the distribution and dynamics of health care costs," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 19(6), pages 705-721.
  3. Iourii Manovskii & Bjoern Bruegemann, 2010. "Fragility: A Quantitative Analysis of the US Health Insurance System," 2010 Meeting Papers 787, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. James J. Heckman & Lance Lochner & Christopher Taber, 1998. "Explaining Rising Wage Inequality: Explorations with a Dynamic General Equilibrium Model of Labor Earnings with Heterogeneous Agents," NBER Working Papers 6384, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Matthew S. Dey & Christopher J. Flinn, 2005. "An Equilibrium Model of Health Insurance Provision and Wage Determination," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 571-627, 03.
  6. Fatih Guvenen & Burhanettin Kuruscu & Serdar Ozkan, 2013. "Taxation of human capital and wage inequality: a cross-country analysis," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2013-20, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
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