Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Immigrant Assimilation:Do Neighborhoods Matter?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Natasha T. Duncan

    ()

  • Brigitte S. Waldorf

    ()
    (Department of Agricultural Economics, College of Agriculture, Purdue University)

Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    The United States provides a path to citizenship for its newcomers. Unlike other immigration countries, however, the United States does not have policies that ease assimilation or directly promote naturalization such as easily accessible and widely advertised language and civic instruction courses. Immigrants are by and large left on their own when facing legal and financial barriers or seeking instruction to pass the citizenship test. Not surprisingly, thus, we find that immigrants’ attributes such as educational attainment, English language proficiency, and income affect naturalization rates. This paper analyzes whether naturalization rates are also affected by neighborhood characteristics and informal networks for assistance and information. Towards that end, we estimate a binary model of immigrants’ citizenship status specifying the size of the immigrant enclave and its level of assimilation as key explanatory variables. The study uses 2005 ACS data, and focuses on immigrants from the Caribbean islands in the New York area. The results suggest that who they are and where they live has substantial impacts on immigrants’ propensities to have acquired US citizenship. Citizenship is unlikely for recent arrivals, those who do not speak English well, are poorly educated, and have a low income. Moreover, living in a neighborhood with a well assimilated immigrant enclave enhances the chance of acquiring US citizenship. This effect is stronger for highly educated than for poorly educated immigrants and thus misses the more vulnerable segments of the immigrant population.

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://ageconsearch.umn.edu/bitstream/46026/2/08-14.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Purdue University, College of Agriculture, Department of Agricultural Economics in its series Working Papers with number 08-13.

    as in new window
    Length: 18 pages
    Date of creation: 2008
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:pae:wpaper:08-14

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: 1145 Krannert Building, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1145
    Phone: 765 494-4191
    Fax: 765 494-9176
    Web page: http://www.agecon.purdue.edu/
    More information through EDIRC

    Related research

    Keywords: US Immigration; Assimilation; Caribbean Immigrants;

    Find related papers by JEL classification:

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Per-Anders Edin & Peter Fredriksson & Olof Åslund, 2004. "Settlement policies and the economic success of immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 133-155, February.
    2. Borjas, George J., 1998. "To Ghetto or Not to Ghetto: Ethnicity and Residential Segregation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 228-253, September.
    3. Harrie A. A Verbon & Lex Meijdam, 2004. "Too Many Migrants, Too Few Services: A Model of Decision-making on Immigration and Integration with Cultural Distance," CESifo Working Paper Series 1268, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Cynthia Feliciano, 2005. "Educational selectivity in U.S. Immigration: How do immigrants compare to those left behind?," Demography, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 131-152, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:pae:wpaper:08-14. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Debby Weber).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.