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Poverty Persistence and Transitions in Uganda: A Combined Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis

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  • David Lawson

Abstract

Despite Uganda`s impressive reduction in monetary based poverty, during the 1990`s, recent evidence has shown there to be substantial mobility into and out of poverty. This paper represents on the first attempts to combine both qualitative and quantitative information to understand the factors underlying such poverty transitions and persistence. Using national participatory assessments and panel data we find a number of factors, such as lack of key physical assets, high dependency ratios and increased household size are identified by both qualitative and quantitative approaches as being major drivers of poverty dynamics. The paper also demonstrates that there is considerable value added in combining the two approaches allowing us to provide a much richer understanding of many of the processes underlying poverty and poverty transitions.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Oxford, Department of Economics in its series Economics Series Working Papers with number GPRG-WPS-004.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2005
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Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:gprg-wps-004

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  1. Mary Jo Bane & David T. Ellwood, 1986. "Slipping into and out of Poverty: The Dynamics of Spells," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 21(1), pages 1-23.
  2. Gaiha, Raghav & Deolalikar, Anil B, 1993. "Persistent, Expected and Innate Poverty: Estimates for Semi-arid Rural South India, 1975-1984," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(4), pages 409-21, December.
  3. Sen, Binayak, 2003. "Drivers of Escape and Descent: Changing Household Fortunes in Rural Bangladesh," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 513-534, March.
  4. Alderman, Harold & Watkins, Susan Cotts & Kohler, Hans-Peter & Maluccio, John A. & Behrman, Jere R., 2000. "Attrition in longitudinal household survey data," FCND briefs, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 96, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Fields, Gary S. & Cichello, Paul & Freije, Samuel & Menéndez, Marta & Newhouse, David, 2003. "Household income dynamics : a four-country story," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/1562, Paris Dauphine University.
  6. Ellis, Frank, 2000. "Rural Livelihoods and Diversity in Developing Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, Oxford University Press, number 9780198296966, October.
  7. Jyotsna Jalan & Martin Ravallion, 2000. "Is transient poverty different? Evidence for rural China," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(6), pages 82-99.
  8. Ravallion, Martin, 1996. "Issues in Measuring and Modelling Poverty," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(438), pages 1328-43, September.
  9. Mckay, Andrew & Lawson, David, 2003. "Assessing the Extent and Nature of Chronic Poverty in Low Income Countries: Issues and Evidence," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 425-439, March.
  10. Benjamin Davis & Marco Stampini, 2002. "Pathways Towards Prosperity in Rural Nicaragua: Why households drop in and out of poverty, and some policy suggestions on how to keep them out," Working Papers, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA) 02-12, Agricultural and Development Economics Division of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO - ESA).
  11. Okrasa, Wlodzimierz, 1999. "Who avoids and who escapes from poverty during transition? - evidence from Polish panel data, 1993-96," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2218, The World Bank.
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Cited by:
  1. Green, Maia & Hulme, David, 2005. "From correlates and characteristics to causes: thinking about poverty from a chronic poverty perspective," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 867-879, June.
  2. Esther K. Ishengoma & Robert Kappel, 2008. "Business Constraints and Growth Potential of Micro and Small Manufacturing Enterprises in Uganda," GIGA Working Paper Series 78, GIGA German Institute of Global and Area Studies.
  3. Laura Camfield & Gina Crivello & Martin Woodhead, 2009. "Wellbeing Research in Developing Countries: Reviewing the Role of Qualitative Methods," Social Indicators Research, Springer, Springer, vol. 90(1), pages 5-31, January.
  4. Hickey, Sam, 2005. "The politics of staying poor: exploring the political space for poverty reduction in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 33(6), pages 995-1009, June.
  5. Stefan Dercon & Joseph S. Shapiro, 2007. "Moving On, Staying Behind, Getting Lost: Lessons on poverty mobility from longitudinal data," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-075, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  6. David Lawson, 2007. "Methodological Issues Associated with Combining Quantitative and Qualitative Approaches to Understanding Poverty Dynamics: Evidence from Uganda," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-077, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  7. Lawrence Sáez, 2013. "Methods in governance research: a review of research approaches," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series, BWPI, The University of Manchester esid-017-13, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  8. Patti Kristjanson & Nelson Mango & Anirudh Krishna & Maren Radeny & Nancy Johnson, 2010. "Understanding poverty dynamics in Kenya," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(7), pages 978-996.
  9. Kristjanson, P. & Krishna, A. & Radeny, M. & Kuan, J. & Quilca, G. & Sanchez-Urrelo, A. & Leon-Velarde, C., 2007. "Poverty dynamics and the role of livestock in the Peruvian Andes," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 94(2), pages 294-308, May.
  10. Paul Mosley, 2013. "Two Africas? Why Africa’s ‘Growth Miracle’ is barely reducing poverty," Brooks World Poverty Institute Working Paper Series, BWPI, The University of Manchester 19113, BWPI, The University of Manchester.
  11. Charles Augustine Abuka & Michael Atingi-Ego & Jacob Opolot & Patrick Okello, 2007. "Determinants of poverty vulnerability in Uganda," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series, IIIS iiisdp203, IIIS.
  12. Stephan Klasen & David Lawson, 2007. "The Impact of Population Growth on Economic Growth and Poverty Reduction in Uganda," Departmental Discussion Papers, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics 133, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics, revised 25 May 2007.
  13. Ssewanyana, Sarah & Kasirye, Ibrahim, 2012. "Poverty and inequality dynamics in Uganda: Insights from the Uganda national Panel Surveys 2005/6 and 2009/10," Research Series, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC) 148953, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
  14. Radeny, Maren & van den Berg, Marrit & Schipper, Rob, 2012. "Rural Poverty Dynamics in Kenya: Structural Declines and Stochastic Escapes," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1577-1593.
  15. Kirimi, Lilian & Sindi, Kirimi, 2006. "A Duration Analysis of Poverty Transitions in Rural Kenya," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association) 21475, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  16. Stephan Klasen, 2005. "Population Growth, (Per Capita) Economic Growth, and Poverty Reduction in Uganda: Theory and Evidence," Departmental Discussion Papers, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics 125, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
  17. Hari Ram Lohano, 2009. "Poverty Dynamics in Rural Sindh, Pakistan," Working Papers id:2334, eSocialSciences.
  18. Kasirye, Ibrahim & Ssewanyana, Sarah N., 2010. "Impacts and determinants of panel survey attrition: The case of Northern Uganda survey 2004-2008," Research Series, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC) 127536, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).

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