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How to find plausible, severe, and useful stress scenarios

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  • Jandacka, Martin

    ()
    (Research Centre PPE, Fachhochschule Vorarlberg, Hochschulstr. 1, A-6850 Dornbirn, Austria.)

  • Rheinberger, Klaus

    ()
    (Research Centre PPE, Fachhochschule Vorarlberg, Hochschulstr. 1, A-6850 Dornbirn, Austria.)

  • Breuer, Thomas

    ()
    (Research Centre PPE, Fachhochschule Vorarlberg, Hochschulstr. 1, A-6850 Dornbirn, Austria.)

  • Summer, Martin

    ()
    (Oesterreichische Nationalbank, Economic Studies Division)

Abstract

We give a precise operational definition to three requirements the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision specifies for stress tests: Plausibility and severity of stress scenarios as well as suggestiveness of risk reducing actions. The basic idea of our approach is to define a suitable region of plausibility in terms of the risk factor distribution and search systematically for the worst portfolio loss over this region. One key innovation compared to the existing literature is the solution of two open problems. We suggest a measure of plausibility that is not prone to the problem of dimensional dependence of maximum loss and we derive a way to consistently deal with situations where some but not all risk factors are stressed. Among the various approaches used for partial scenarios, plausibility is maximised by setting the non stressed risk factors to their conditional expected value given the value of the stressed risk factors.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank) in its series Working Papers with number 150.

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Length: 29
Date of creation: 05 Feb 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:onb:oenbwp:150

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Postal: Oesterreichische Nationalbank, Economic Studies Division, c/o Beate Hofbauer-Berlakovich, POB 61, A-1011 Vienna, Austria
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Keywords: Stress testing; maximum loss; risk management; banking regulation.;

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References

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  1. M. Hashem Pesaran & Til Schuermann & Björn-Jakob Treutler, 2005. "Global Business Cycles and Credit Risk," NBER Working Papers 11493, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Stephane Dees & Filippo di Mauro & M. Hashem Pesaran & L. Vanessa Smith, 2004. "Exploring the International Linkages of the Euro Area: A Global VAR Analysis," IEPR Working Papers 04.6, Institute of Economic Policy Research (IEPR).
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Schechtman, Ricardo & Gaglianone, Wagner Piazza, 2012. "Macro stress testing of credit risk focused on the tails," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 174-192.
  2. Duellmann, Klaus & Kick, Thomas, 2012. "Stress testing German banks against a global cost-of-capital shock," Discussion Papers 04/2012, Deutsche Bundesbank, Research Centre.
  3. Christian Schmieder & Maher Hasan & Claus Puhr, 2011. "Next Generation Balance Sheet Stress Testing," IMF Working Papers 11/83, International Monetary Fund.
  4. Agata Gemzik-Salwach, 2012. "The Use Of A Value At Risk Measure For The Analysis Of Bank Interest Margins," "e-Finanse", University of Information Technology and Management, Institute of Financial Research and Analysis, vol. 8(4), pages 15-29, February.
  5. McNeil, Alexander J. & Smith, Andrew D., 2012. "Multivariate stress scenarios and solvency," Insurance: Mathematics and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 299-308.
  6. Roman Horváth & Dan Vaško, 2013. "Central Bank Transparency and Financial Stability: Measurement, Determinants and Effects," FIW Working Paper series 113, FIW.
  7. Buncic, Daniel & Melecky, Martin, 2013. "Macroprudential stress testing of credit risk: A practical approach for policy makers," Journal of Financial Stability, Elsevier, vol. 9(3), pages 347-370.
  8. Dimitrios Bisias & Mark Flood & Andrew W. Lo & Stavros Valavanis, 2012. "A Survey of Systemic Risk Analytics," Annual Review of Financial Economics, Annual Reviews, vol. 4(1), pages 255-296, October.
  9. Adam Gersl & Petr Jakubik & Tomas Konecny & Jakub Seidler, 2012. "Dynamic Stress Testing: The Framework for Testing Banking Sector Resilience Used by the Czech National Bank," Working Papers 2012/11, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
  10. Breuer, Thomas & Jandačka, Martin & Mencía, Javier & Summer, Martin, 2012. "A systematic approach to multi-period stress testing of portfolio credit risk," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 332-340.
  11. Michal Franta & Jozef Barunik & Roman Horvath & Katerina Smidkova, 2011. "Are Bayesian Fan Charts Useful for Central Banks? Uncertainty, Forecasting, and Financial Stability Stress Tests," Working Papers 2011/10, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
  12. Abdelaziz Rouabah & John Theal, 2010. "Stress testing: The impact of shocks on the capital needs of the Luxembourg banking sector," BCL working papers 47, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
  13. Adam Gersl & Jakub Seidler, 2012. "How to Improve the Quality of Stress Tests through Backtesting," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 62(4), pages 325-346, August.
  14. Adam Gersl & Jakub Seidler, 2010. "Conservative Stress Testing: The Role of Regular Verification," Working Papers IES 2010/12, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute of Economic Studies, revised Jul 2008.
  15. Breuer, Thomas & Csiszár, Imre, 2013. "Systematic stress tests with entropic plausibility constraints," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 1552-1559.
  16. Adam Gersl & Petr Jakubik & Tomas Konecny & Jakub Seidler, 2013. "Dynamic Stress Testing: The Framework for Assessing the Resilience of the Banking Sector Used by the Czech National Bank," Czech Journal of Economics and Finance (Finance a uver), Charles University Prague, Faculty of Social Sciences, vol. 63(6), pages 505-536, December.
  17. Adam Gersl & Jakub Seidler, 2010. "Stress Test Verification as Part of an Advanced Stress-Testing Framework," Occasional Publications - Chapters in Edited Volumes, in: CNB Financial Stability Report 2009/2010, chapter 0, pages 92-101 Czech National Bank, Research Department.

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