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The Importance of Parental Knowledge and Social Norms: Evidence from Weight Report Cards in Mexico

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  • Silvia Prina
  • Heather Royer

Abstract

The rise of childhood obesity in less developed countries is often overlooked. We study the impact of body weight report cards in Mexico. The report cards increased parental knowledge and shifted parental attitudes about children's weight. We observe no meaningful changes in parental behaviors or children's body mass index. Interestingly, parents of children in the most obese classrooms were less likely to report that their obese child weighed too much relative to those in the least obese classrooms. As obesity rates increase, reference points for appropriate body weights may rise, making it more difficult to lower obesity rates.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19344.

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Date of creation: Aug 2013
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19344

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  1. S. Dellavigna., 2011. "Psychology and Economics: Evidence from the Field," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 5.
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