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The Performance Effects of IT-Enabled Knowledge Management Practices

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  • Peter Cappelli
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    Abstract

    The extensive literature on knowledge management spans several fields, but there are remarkably few studies that address the basic question as to whether knowledge management practices improve organizational performance. I examine that question using a national probability sample of establishments, clear measures of IT-driven knowledge management practices, and an experimental design that offers a unique approach for addressing concerns about endogeneity and omitted variables. The results indicate that the use of company intranets, data warehousing practices, performance support systems, and employee competency databases have significant and meaningful effects on a range of relevant business outcomes.

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    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w16248.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16248.

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    Date of creation: Aug 2010
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    Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16248

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    1. Erik Brynjolfsson & Lorin M. Hitt, 2003. "Computing Productivity: Firm-Level Evidence," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 85(4), pages 793-808, November.
    2. Nick Bloom & John Van Reenen, 2006. "Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries," CEP Discussion Papers dp0716, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
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    Cited by:
    1. Nina Czernich, 2011. "The emergence of broadband internet and consequences for economic and social development," ifo Beitr├Ąge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 37.

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