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Policy Responses to Exchange-Rate Movements

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  • Laurence M. Ball

Abstract

This paper examines policy responses to exchange-rate movements in a simple model of an open economy. The optimal response of monetary policy to an exchange-rate change depends on the source of the change: on whether the underlying shock is a shift in capital flows, manufactured exports, or commodity prices. The paper compares the model’s prescriptions to the policies of an actual central bank, the Bank of Canada. Finally, the paper considers the role of fiscal policy in an open economy. Coordinated fiscal and monetary responses to exchange-rate movements stabilize output at the sectoral as well as aggregate level.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 15173.

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Date of creation: Jul 2009
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Publication status: published as Laurence Ball, 2010. "Policy Responses to Exchange-rate Movements," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 187-199, April.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15173

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  1. Christopher Ragan, 2005. "The Exchange Rate and Canadian Inflation Targeting," Bank of Canada Review, Bank of Canada, vol. 2005(Autumn), pages 41-50.
  2. Laurence M. Ball, 1999. "Policy Rules for Open Economies," NBER Chapters, in: Monetary Policy Rules, pages 127-156 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Giancarlo Corsetti & Paolo Pesenti, 2001. "International dimensions of optimal monetary policy," Staff Reports 124, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Christopher Ragan, 2005. "The Exchange Rate and Canadian Inflation Targeting," Working Papers 05-34, Bank of Canada.
  5. Stephen Murchison & Andrew Rennison, 2006. "ToTEM: The Bank of Canada's New Quarterly Projection Model," Technical Reports 97, Bank of Canada.
  6. Laurence Ball, 2010. "Policy Responses to Exchange-rate Movements," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 21(2), pages 187-199, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Nannette Lindenberg & Frank Westermann, 2009. "How Strong is the Case for Dollarization in Costa Rica? A Note on the Business Cycle Comovements with the United States," Working Papers 79, Institute of Empirical Economic Research.
  2. Laurence M. Ball, 2009. "Policy Responses to Exchange-Rate Movements," NBER Working Papers 15173, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Hyuk Rhee & Nurlan Turdaliev, 2012. "Targeting Rules for an Open Economy," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 447-471, July.
  4. Kenza Benhima, 2008. "Exhange Rate Volatility and Productivity Growth : The Role of Liability Dollarization," Working Papers 2008-11, Centre de Recherche en Economie et Statistique.
  5. Waldyr Areosa & Marta Areosa, 2012. "The Signaling Effect of Exchange Rates: pass-through under dispersed information," Working Papers Series 282, Central Bank of Brazil, Research Department.

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