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Pension Inequality

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  • Edward P. Lazear
  • Sherwin Rosen

Abstract

Pensions may contribute to male/female or black/white inequality to the extent that white males are more likely to receive pensions than are other groups. Conditional on receiving pensions, the value of pension benefits varies because white males have the highest level of expected tenure atretirement. By using a combination of the Current Population Survey and the 1980 Banker's Trust Corpprate Pension Plan Study, we find that the existence of pension plans contributes to black/white inequality but leaves male/female inequality unchanged among whites. Even though females are less likely tor eceive pensions than males, those females who do receive pensions enjoy generous ones. Among blacks, pensions exacerbate sex differences because black women are only about 75% as likely to receive pensions as black males.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w1477.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 1477.

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Date of creation: Oct 1984
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Publication status: published as Bodie, Z., J.B. Shoven and D.A. Wise (eds.) Issues in Pension Economics. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1987.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:1477

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  1. Jacob Mincer & Boyan Jovanovic, 1979. "Labor Mobility and Wages," NBER Working Papers 0357, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Cited by:
  1. Janet Currie, 1993. "Gender Gaps in Benefits Coverage," NBER Working Papers 4265, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Mitchell, Olivia S, 1988. "Worker Knowledge of Pension Provisions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(1), pages 21-39, January.
  3. Pozzebon, Silvana & Mitchell, Olivia S, 1989. "Married Women's Retirement Behavior," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 39-53.
  4. Mitchell, Olivia S, 1991. "Social Security Reforms and Poverty among Older Dual-Earner Couples," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 4(4), pages 281-93, November.
  5. Aggarwal, Raj & Goodell, John W., 2013. "Political-economy of pension plans: Impact of institutions, gender, and culture," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1860-1879.
  6. Alan L. Gustman & Thomas L. Steinmeier, 1988. "An Analysis Of Pension Benefit Formulas, Pension Wealth And Incentives From Pensions," NBER Working Papers 2535, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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