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Crossover Inventions And Knowledge Diffusion Of General Purpose Technologies? Evidence From The Electrical Technology

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  • Shih-tse Lo
  • Dhanoos Sutthiphisal

Abstract

Scholars have long noted the significant impact of general purpose technologies (GPTs) on the economy. However, limited attention has been paid to exploring how they are employed to generate inventions in downstream sectors (crossover inventions), and what factors may facilitate such diffusion. We study these issues by examining the introduction of one of the widely regarded GPTs -- electrical technology -- in the late 19th century U.S. We find that knowledge spillovers between industries (inter-industry spillovers and learning-by-using) had little influence on the geography of crossover inventions as well as the speed and productivity of inventors at making them. Instead, appropriate human capital and an environment promoting inventions in general played a more important role.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 14043.

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Date of creation: May 2008
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Publication status: published as The Journal of Economic History The Journal of Economic History / Volume 70 / Issue 03 / September 2010, pp 744-764 Copyright © The Economic History Association 2010 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022050710000604 (About DOI), Published online: 06 September 2010
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14043

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Cited by:
  1. Badibanga, Thaddee Mutumba & Diao, Xinshen & Roe, Terry L. & Somwaru, Agapi, 2008. "Dynamics of Structural Transformation: Understanding the Key Factors That Drive Innovative Activities in Selected Asian and African Countries," Bulletins 43890, University of Minnesota, Economic Development Center.
  2. Engelstätter, Benjamin & Sarbu, Miruna, 2011. "The adoption of social enterprise software," ZEW Discussion Papers 11-078, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.

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