Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Understanding Changes in Maori Incomes and Income Equality 1997-2003

Contents:

Author Info

  • Sylvia Dixon

    ()
    (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

  • David C. Maré

    ()
    (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research)

Abstract

This paper reports findings from a study of changes in Maori income levels and income dispersion between 1997 and 2003. Data from Statistics New Zealand's Income Survey are used to describe and evaluate the main changes in the Maori income distribution in this period, which was marked by substantial increases in employment rates and improvements in the skill levels of working-aged Maori. A parallel analysis of the main changes in the European/Pakeha income distribution is provided for comparative purposes. The results show significant reductions in the proportion of Maori with no weekly income in the reference week, or incomes of $150-200 a week, and significant increases in the proportion with incomes above the peak income level of approximately $550 per week. Income inequality within the total working-aged Maori population declined, while income inequality among employed Maori was stable. An analysis of some of the key factors contributing to change in the income distribution suggests that the transition of many Maori into employment during this period was the single most important driver of change.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://motu-www.motu.org.nz/wpapers/04_12.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Motu Economic and Public Policy Research in its series Working Papers with number 04_12.

as in new window
Length: 61 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:04_12

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Level1, 93 Cuba Street, P.O. Box 24390, Wellington
Phone: 64-4-939-4250
Fax: 64-4-939-4251
Email:
Web page: http://www.motu.org.nz
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Individual income distribution; Inequality; Maori; Kernel density estimation;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Barsky R. & Bound J. & Charles K.K. & Lupton J.P., 2002. "Accounting for the Black-White Wealth Gap: A Nonparametric Approach," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 97, pages 663-673, September.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Sylvia Dixon & David C. Maré, 2005. "Changes in the Maori Income Distribution: Evidence from the Population Census," Working Papers 05_06, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  2. Damien S.Eldridge & Ilke Onur & Malathi Velamuri & Cagatay Koc, 2013. "The Impact of Private Hospital Insurance on the Utilization of Hospital Care In Australia," Working Papers 2013.03, School of Economics, La Trobe University.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:mtu:wpaper:04_12. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Tui Head).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.