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Mismatch in Law School

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  • Jesse Rothstein
  • Albert Yoon

Abstract

An important criticism of race-based higher education admission preferences is that they may hurt minority students who attend more selective schools than they would in the absence of such preferences. We categorize the non-experimental research designs available for the study of so-called "mismatch" effects and evaluate the likely biases in each. We select two comparisons and use them to examine mismatch effects in law school. We find no evidence of mismatch effects on any students' employment outcomes or on the graduation or bar passage rates of black students with moderate or strong entering credentials. What evidence there is for mismatch comes from less-qualified black students who typically attend second- or third-tier schools. Many of these students would not have been admitted to any law school without preferences, however, and the resulting sample selection prevents strong conclusions.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 14275.

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Date of creation: Aug 2008
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14275

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  1. Stacy Berg Dale & Alan Krueger, 1998. "Estimating the Payoff to Attending a More Selective College: An Application of Selection on Observables and Unobservables," Working Papers, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section. 788, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  2. DiNardo, John & Fortin, Nicole M & Lemieux, Thomas, 1996. "Labor Market Institutions and the Distribution of Wages, 1973-1992: A Semiparametric Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 64(5), pages 1001-44, September.
  3. Rothstein, J.M.Jesse M., 2004. "College performance predictions and the SAT," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 121(1-2), pages 297-317.
  4. David Neumark & Harry Holzer, 2000. "Assessing Affirmative Action," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 38(3), pages 483-568, September.
  5. Alan Krueger & Jesse Rothstein & Sarah Turner, 2005. "Race, Income and College in 25 Years: The Continuing Legacy of Segregation and Discrimination," Working Papers, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies. 94, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Center for Economic Policy Studies..
  6. Jesse Rothstein & Albert Yoon, 2008. "Mismatch in Law School," NBER Working Papers 14275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Dehejia, R.H. & Wahba, S., 1998. "Propensity Score Matching Methods for Non-Experimental Causal Studies," Discussion Papers, Columbia University, Department of Economics 1998_02, Columbia University, Department of Economics.
  8. Joseph G. Altonji & Todd E. Elder & Christopher R. Taber, 2000. "Selection on Observed and Unobserved Variables: Assessing the Effectiveness of Catholic Schools," NBER Working Papers 7831, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Jesse Rothstein & Albert H. Yoon, 2008. "Affirmative Action in Law School Admissions: What Do Racial Preferences Do?," NBER Working Papers 14276, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Loury, Linda Datcher & Garman, David, 1995. "College Selectivity and Earnings," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(2), pages 289-308, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Braz Camargo & Ralph Stinebrickner & Todd R. Stinebrickner, 2010. "Interracial Friendships in College," NBER Working Papers 15970, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. repec:reg:wpaper:630 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Bertrand, Marianne & Hanna, Rema & Mullainathan, Sendhil, 2010. "Affirmative action in education: Evidence from engineering college admissions in India," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 94(1-2), pages 16-29, February.
  4. Jesse Rothstein & Albert Yoon, 2008. "Mismatch in Law School," NBER Working Papers 14275, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Peter Arcidiacono & Esteban M. Aucejo & Hanming Fang & Kenneth I. Spenner, 2010. "Does Affirmative Action Lead to Mismatch? A New Test and Evidence," Working Papers, Duke University, Department of Economics 10-26, Duke University, Department of Economics.
  6. Cortes, Kalena E., 2010. "Do Bans on Affirmative Action Hurt Minority Students? Evidence from the Texas Top 10% Plan," IZA Discussion Papers 5021, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Rodney J. Andrews & Jing Li & Michael F. Lovenheim, 2012. "Quantile Treatment Effects of College Quality on Earnings: Evidence from Administrative Data in Texas," NBER Working Papers 18068, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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