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The Wage and Non-wage Costs of Displacement: Evidence from Russia

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  • Hartmut Lehmann

    ()

  • Alexander Muravyev
  • Tiziano Razzolini

    ()

  • Anzelika Zaiceva

    ()

Abstract

This paper is the first to analyze the costs of job loss in Russia, using unique new data from the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey over the years 2003-2008, including a special supplement on displacement that was initiated by us. We employ fixed effects regression models and propensity score matching techniques in order to establish the causal effect of displacement for displaced individuals. The paper is innovative insofar as we investigate fringe and in-kind benefits and the propensity to have an informal employment relationship as well as a permanent contract as relevant labor market outcomes upon displacement. We also analyze monthly earnings, hourly wages, employment and hours worked, which are traditionally investigated in the literature. Compared to the control group of non-displaced workers (i.e. stayers and quitters), displaced individuals face a significant income loss following displacement, which is mainly due to the reduction in employment and hours worked. This effect is robust to the definition of displacement. The losses seem to be more pronounced and are especially large for older workers with labor market experience and human capital acquired in Soviet times and for workers with primary and secondary education. Workers displaced from state firms experience particularly large relative losses in the short run, while such losses for workers laid off from private firms are more persistent. Turning to the additional non-conventional labor market outcomes, there is a loss in terms of the number of fringe and in-kind benefits for reemployed individuals but not in terms of their value. There is also some evidence of an increased probability of working in informal jobs if displaced. These results point towards the importance of both firm-specific human capital and of obsolete skills obtained under the centrally planned economy as well as to a wider occurrence of job insecurity among displaced workers

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics in its series Center for Economic Research (RECent) with number 060.

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Length: pages 54
Date of creation: May 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mod:recent:060

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Web page: http://www.recent.unimore.it/
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Keywords: Costs of job loss; worker displacement; propensity score matching; Russia;

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References

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  1. Neal, Derek, 1995. "Industry-Specific Human Capital: Evidence from Displaced Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 13(4), pages 653-77, October.
  2. Hartmut Lehmann & Kaia Phillips & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2002. "The Incidence and Cost of Job Loss in a Transition Economy: Displaced Workers in Estonia, 1989-1999," CERT Discussion Papers 0209, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
  3. Andrea Ichino & Guido Schwerdt & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer & Andrea Ichino, 2013. "Too Old to Work, Too Young to Retire?," Economics working papers 2013-13, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
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  7. Orazem, Peter F. & Vodopivec, Milan & Wu, Ruth, 2004. "Worker Displacement during the Transition: Experience from Slovenia," IZA Discussion Papers 1297, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Hartmut Lehmann & Norberto Pignatti & Jonathan Wadsworth, 2005. "The Incidence and Cost of Job Loss in the Ukrainian Labor Market," CERT Discussion Papers 0504, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
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  10. Alexander Hijzen & Richard Upward & Peter W. Wright, 2010. "The Income Losses of Displaced Workers," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(1).
  11. H. Lehmann & A. Muravyev, 2010. "Labor market institutions and labor market performance: what can we learn from transition countries?," Working Papers 714, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  12. Kenneth A. Couch & Dana W. Placzek, 2010. "Earnings Losses of Displaced Workers Revisited," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 572-89, March.
  13. Muravyev, Alexander, 2010. "Evolution of Employment Protection Legislation in the USSR, CIS and Baltic States, 1985-2009," IZA Discussion Papers 5365, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. I Grosfeld & P Hare, 1991. "Privatization in Hungary," CEP Discussion Papers dp0031, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  15. T. Dolgopiatova, 2007. "Ownership Concentration and Russian Company Development: Empirical Evidence," Problems of Economic Transition, M.E. Sharpe, Inc., vol. 50(5), pages 7-23, September.
  16. Daniel Sullivan & Till von Wachter, 2009. "Job Displacement and Mortality: An Analysis Using Administrative Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1265-1306, August.
  17. Heckman, James J. & Lalonde, Robert J. & Smith, Jeffrey A., 1999. "The economics and econometrics of active labor market programs," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 31, pages 1865-2097 Elsevier.
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Cited by:
  1. H. Lehmann & T. Razzolini & A. Zaiceva, 2011. "Job Separations, Job Loss and Informality in the Russian Labor Market," Working Papers wp800, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  2. Y. Ge & H. Lehmann, 2013. "The Costs of Worker Displacement in Urban Labor Markets of China," Working Papers wp876, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  3. Lehmann, Hartmut & Razzolini, Tiziano & Zaiceva, Anzelika, 2011. "Job Separations and Informality in the Russian Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 6230, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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