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Advertising, Entry Deterrence, and Industry Innovation

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  • Shi Qi

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    (Department of Economics, University of Minnesota)

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    Abstract

    This paper studies how advertising influences firms’ incentives to invest in R&D. The link between advertising and industry innovation is important, not only because advertising can spur R&D by spreading product knowledge, but also because advertising can discourage new innovative firms from entering the industry. This paper finds that a worse advertising technology can result in local improvements in industry innovation rates. Globally, however, a complete ban on advertising always reduce industry growth. This result is significant because industry advertising spending is quantitatively significant and there are potential connections between public policy towards advertising and R&D. This paper presents a variant of the Grossman and Helpman (1991) quality ladder model. The key difference is that the model in this paper allows advertising to gradually spread product awareness among consumers. This model differs from the entry deterrence literature by assuming perfect price discrimination. Technically, this assumption allows a fully tractable model and analytical characterization of a stationary equilibrium in a dynamic setting, which is not previously available. In terms of economic analysis, this assumption eliminates the extra profit incentives for new firms to enter early, and makes incumbent firms more inclined to use advertising as a deterrent.

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    File URL: http://www.econ.umn.edu/merr/2008_1.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Minnesota, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 2008-1.

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    Length: 40 pages
    Date of creation: 03 2008
    Date of revision: 03 2008
    Handle: RePEc:min:wpaper:2008-1

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    Keywords: Advertising; Entry Deterrence; Innovation;

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    References

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    1. Philippe Aghion & Peter Howitt, 1990. "A Model of Growth Through Creative Destruction," NBER Working Papers 3223, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Grossman, Gene M & Shapiro, Carl, 1984. "Informative Advertising with Differentiated Products," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 63-81, January.
    3. Segerstrom, Paul S, 1998. "Endogenous Growth without Scale Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(5), pages 1290-1310, December.
    4. Rafael Rob & Arthur Fishman, 2005. "Is Bigger Better? Customer Base Expansion through Word-of-Mouth Reputation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(5), pages 1146-1175, October.
    5. Ishigaki, Hiroaki, 2000. "Informative advertising and entry deterrence: a Bertrand model," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 337-343, June.
    6. Boyer, M. & Moreaux, M., 1998. "Strategic Underinvestment in Informative Advertising: the Cases of Subsitutes and Complements," Papers 98.502, Toulouse - GREMAQ.
    7. Ulrich Doraszelski & Mark Satterthwaite, 2003. "Foundations of Markov-Perfect Industry Dynamics. Existence, Purification, and Multiplicity," Discussion Papers 1383, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
    8. Schmalensee, Richard, 1983. "Advertising and Entry Deterrence: An Exploratory Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(4), pages 636-53, August.
    9. Daniel A. Ackerberg, 2003. "Advertising, learning, and consumer choice in experience good markets: an empirical examination," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 44(3), pages 1007-1040, 08.
    10. Jones, Charles I, 1995. "R&D-Based Models of Economic Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(4), pages 759-84, August.
    11. Matthew Mitchell & Andy Skrzypacz, 2006. "Market Structure and the Direction of Technological Change," 2006 Meeting Papers 422, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    12. Ericson, Richard & Pakes, Ariel, 1995. "Markov-Perfect Industry Dynamics: A Framework for Empirical Work," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 62(1), pages 53-82, January.
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