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Xenophobic Attacks, Migration Intentions and Networks: Evidence from the South of Africa

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  • Guido Friebel
  • Juan Miguel Gallego
  • Mariapia Mendola

    ()

Abstract

We investigate how emigration flows from a developing region are affected by xenophobic violence at destination. Our empirical analysis is based on a unique survey among more than 1000 households collected in Mozambique in summe 2008, a few months after a series of xenophobic attacks in South Africa killed dozens and displaced thousands of immigrants from neighbouring countries. We estimate migration intentions of Mozambicans before and after the attacks, controlling for the characteristics of households and previous migration behaviour. Using a placebo period, we show that other things equal, the migration intention of household heads decreases from 37 to 33 percent. The sensitivity of migration intentions to violence is larger for household heads with many children younger than 15 years, decreasing the migration intention by 11 percentage points. Most importantly, the sensitivity of migration intentions is highest for those household heads with many young children whose families have no access to social networks. For these household heads, the intention falls by 15 percentage points. Social networks provide insurance against the consequences young children suffer in case the household head would be harmed by xenophobic violence and consequently could not provide for the family.

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File URL: http://dipeco.economia.unimib.it/repec/pdf/mibwpaper213.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 213.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2011
Date of revision: Nov 2011
Handle: RePEc:mib:wpaper:213

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Keywords: violence; risk; migration; household behaviour; Mozambique;

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Facchini, Giovanni & Mayda, Anna Maria & Mendola, Mariapia, 2013. "South-South Migration and the Labor Market: Evidence from South Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 7362, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Christian Dustmann & Anna Okatenko, 2013. "Out-migration, Wealth Constraints, and the Quality of Local Amenities," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2013017, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  3. de Coulon, Augustin & Radu, Dragos & Steinhardt, Max Friedrich, 2013. "Pane e Cioccolata: The impact of native attitudes on return migration," HWWI Research Papers 146, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).

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