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Mediating role of education and lifestyles in the relationship betwee early-life conditions and health: evidence from the 1958 British cohort

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Author Info

  • Tubeuf

    ()
    (Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds)

  • Florence Jusot

    (LEDa-LEGOS, Université Paris-Dauphine and IRDES (Institut de Recherche et de Documentation en Economie de la Santé). Paris (France))

  • Damien Bricard

    (LEDa-LEGOS, Université Paris-Dauphine, Paris (France))

Abstract

The paper focuses on the long-term effects of early-life conditions with comparison to lifestyles and current socioeconomic factors on health status in a cohort of British people born in 1958. Using the longitudinal follow-up data at age 23, 33, 42 and 46, we build a dynamic model to investigate the influence of each determinant on health and the mediating role of education and lifestyles in the relationship between early-life conditions and later health. Direct and indirect effects of early-life conditions on adult health are explored using auxiliary linear regressions of education and lifestyles and panel Probit specifications of self-assessed health with random effects addressing individual unexplained heterogeneity. Our study shows that early-life conditions are important parameters for adult health, their contribution to health disparities increases from 17.8% to 23% when mediating effects are identified. They also shape other health determinants: the contribution of lifestyles reduces from 28% down to 22% when indirect effects of early-life conditions are distinguished. Noticeably, the absence of father at the time of birth and experience of financial hardships represent the lead factors for direct effects on health. The absence of obesity at 16 influences health both directly and indirectly working through lifestyles.

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File URL: http://medhealth.leeds.ac.uk/download/534/auhe_wp11_06
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Academic Unit of Health Economics, Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds in its series Working Papers with number 1106.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Health Economics, 3rd of May 2012, Volume 21(S1), pages 129-150
Handle: RePEc:lee:wpaper:1106

Note: The definitive version is available at www3.interscience.wiley.com (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hec.2815/abstract)
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Keywords: cohort; decomposition; early-life conditions; education; lifestyles;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Emma Gorman & Grant M Scobie & Andy Towers, 2012. "Health and Retirement of Older New Zealanders," Treasury Working Paper Series 12/02, New Zealand Treasury.
  2. Tubeuf, Sandy & Trannoy, Alain & Jusot, Florence & Bricard, Damien, 2013. "Inequalities of Opportunities in Health and Natural Reward: a European Perspective," Economics Papers from University Paris Dauphine 123456789/11716, Paris Dauphine University.
  3. Thomas Leoni & Rainer Eppel, 2013. "Women's Work and Family Profiles over the Lifecourse and their Subsequent Health Outcomes. Evidence for Europe," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 28, WWWforEurope.

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