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Can Targeted, Non-Cognitive Skills Programs Improve Achievement? Evidence from EPIS

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  • Martins, Pedro S.

    ()
    (Queen Mary, University of London)

Abstract

EPIS is an original and large private-sector program aimed at improving student achievement and eroding early school leaving at Portuguese state schools. The program first screens students to focus only on those more likely to perform poorly; and then conducts a number of small-group sessions aimed at improving the non-cognitive skills (e.g. study skills, motivation, self-esteem) of the selected students. Our quasi-experimental evidence of the effects of EPIS is drawn from rich longitudinal student data and the different timings in the roll-out of the program, both within and across schools. The results indicate that the program reduced grade retention by at least 10 percentage points and did so in a cost effective way.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5266.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: Oct 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5266

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Related research

Keywords: student achievement; program evaluation; matched school-student data;

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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. What Do Students Learn in College?
    by Martin Ryan in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2011-03-09 18:07:00
  2. Can Targeted, Non-Cognitive Skills Programs Improve Achievement?
    by Martin Ryan in Geary Behaviour Centre on 2011-01-03 16:34:00
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Cited by:
  1. Martin Schlotter, 2011. "Age at Preschool Entrance and Noncognitive Skills before School - An Instrumental Variable Approach," Ifo Working Paper Series, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich Ifo Working Paper No. 112, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
  2. Mendolia, Silvia & Walker, Ian, 2013. "The Effect of Non-Cognitive Traits on Health Behaviours in Adolescence," IZA Discussion Papers, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) 7301, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. James J. Heckman & Tim D. Kautz, 2012. "Hard Evidence on Soft Skills," NBER Working Papers, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc 18121, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Dahmann, Sarah & Anger, Silke, 2014. "The Impact of Education on Personality: Evidence from a German High School Reform," IZA Discussion Papers, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) 8139, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. James Heckman & Tim Kautz, 2013. "Fostering and Measuring Skills: Interventions That Improve Character and Cognition," Working Papers, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group 2013-019, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  6. Elke Lüdemann, 2011. "Schooling and the Formation of Cognitive and Non-cognitive Outcomes," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 39, 8.

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