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Adult Outcomes for Children of Teenage Mothers

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  • Francesconi, Marco

    ()
    (University of Essex)

Abstract

Using data from the British Household Panel Survey, this study examines the relationship between several outcomes in early adulthood (e.g., education, inactivity, earnings, and health) and being born to a teenage mother. Besides standard cross-sectional multivariate regression estimates, we also present evidence from nonparametric estimates and from estimates that account for unmeasured family background heterogeneity by comparing siblings born to the same mother who timed their births at different ages. Regardless of the econometric technique, being born to a teenage mother is usually associated with worse outcomes. An important channel of transmission of this adverse effect is childhood family structure, which plays a more powerful role than childhood family poverty. Albeit smaller, some of the detrimental effects are also found for children of mothers who gave birth in their early twenties.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 2778.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: May 2007
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Scandinavian Journal of Economics, 2008, 110 (1), 93-117
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2778

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Keywords: intergenerational processes; endowment heterogeneity; teenage pregnancy; identification issues; sibling estimators;

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References

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  1. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2003. "Why the apple doesn't fall far: understanding intergenerational transmission of human capital," CeMMAP working papers CWP16/03, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
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  23. repec:ese:iserwp:2003-28 is not listed on IDEAS
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Nilsson, J Peter, 2008. "Does a pint a day affect your child’s pay? The effect of prenatal alcohol exposure on adult outcomes," Working Paper Series 2008:4, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
  2. Murat G. Kýrdar & Meltem Dayýoglu Tayfur & Ýsmet Koç, 2010. "The Effect of Compulsory Schooling Laws on Teenage Marriage and Births in Turkey," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1035, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
  3. Nicola Branson & Cally Ardington & Murray Leibbrandt, 2011. "Health outcomes for children born to teen mothers in Cape Town, South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 55, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  4. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereaux & Kjell Salvanes, 2004. "Fast Times at Ridgemont High? The Effect of Compulsory Schooling Laws on Teenage Births," NBER Working Papers 10911, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Dylan Kneale & Ruth Lupton, 2010. "Are there neighbourhood effects on teenage parenthood in the UK, and does it matter for policy? A review of theory and evidence," CASE Papers case141, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
  6. Anna Sibilla Francesca DE PAOLI, 2010. "The effect of schooling on fertility, labor market participation and children?s outcomes, evidence from Ecuador," Departmental Working Papers 2010-30, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  7. Marcén, Miriam & Bellido, Héctor, 2013. "Teen Mothers and Culture," MPRA Paper 44712, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. de Haan, Monique & Plug, Erik & Rosero, José, 2012. "Birth Order and Human Capital Development: Evidence from Ecuador," IZA Discussion Papers 6706, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Favara, Marta, 2013. "Is Self-Esteem a "Double Edged Sword"? Self-Esteem and the Onset of Adolescent Sexual Activity," IZA Discussion Papers 7171, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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