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Financial Flows and Exchange Rates: Challenges Faced by Developing Countries

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  • Raquel Almeida Ramos

    ()
    (IPC-IG)

Abstract

With the global financial crisis, emerging developing countries have been experiencing marked cycles of capital flows: significant inflows until the collapse of Lehman Brothers; a sudden outflow in the sequence; a rebound of inflows some months after; and, more recently, more short-lived periods of risk aversion and outflows due to the problems concerning the Euro. This period has been of singular intensity, with cycles changing much more rapidly than previously. The different intensity has major implications for understanding the process, especially regarding the relative importance of push and pull factors and the formulation of policy options. (?)

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File URL: http://www.ipc-undp.org/pub/IPCWorkingPaper97.pdf
File Function: First version, 2012
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth in its series Working Papers with number 97.

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Length: 19
Date of creation: Nov 2012
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published by UNDP - International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth , November 2012, pages 1-19
Handle: RePEc:ipc:wpaper:97

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Keywords: Financial Flows and Exchange Rates: Challenges Faced by Developing Countries;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Raquel Almeida Ramos, 2012. "Dealing with Exchange Rate Issues: Reserves or Capital Controls?," Policy Research Brief 32, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth.

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