Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Agricultural Trade and the Doha Round: Lessons from Commodity Studies

Contents:

Author Info

Abstract

While global analytical approaches to agricultural trade liberalization yield large gains for most economies, there are substantial variations in the policy regimes across commodities. To clarify the multiplicity of distortions and impacts, the World Bank's Trade Department undertook a series of commodity studies. The studies highlight the important challenges faced by negotiating countries in the Doha Round of the World Trade Organization (WTO) trade negotiations. The studies provide a sharper look at the North-South dimensions of the agricultural trade debate, with the North's trade barriers, domestic support, and tariff escalation. They also underscore the South-South challenges on border protection and the reduced rural income opportunities for the lowest-income countries due to policies in higher-income countries that depress world prices. Agricultural trade liberalization would induce significant price increases for most commodities. The studies identify the detrimental effects of multilateral trade liberalization for some countries because of lost preferential trade agreements and higher prices on net consumers of commodities. Given the complexity of specific issues in agriculture, as well as the North-South and South-South dimensions of distortions, a global solution would be required to liberalize these markets. Rather than being self-contained, agricultural trade negotiations should involve concessions on other sectors and issues (services and intellectual property rights for example) to identify overall reform packages palatable to all parties.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.card.iastate.edu/publications/DBS/PDFFiles/03bp42.pdf
File Function: Full Text
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://www.card.iastate.edu/publications/synopsis.aspx?id=489
File Function: Online Synopsis
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University in its series Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications with number 03-bp42.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Jul 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ias:cpaper:03-bp42

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 578 Heady Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011-1070
Phone: (515) 294-1183
Fax: (515) 294-6336
Email:
Web page: http://www.card.iastate.edu/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: agricultural policy; commodities; Doha Round; trade negotiations; WTO.;

Other versions of this item:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Bruce A. Babcock & John C. Beghin & Jacinto F. Fabiosa & Stephane De Cara & Amani Elobeid & Cheng Fang & Chad E. Hart & Murat Isik & Holger Matthey & Alexander E. Saak & Karen Kovarik & FAPRI Staff, 2002. "Doha Round of the World Trade Organization: Appraising Further Liberalization of Agricultural Markets, The," Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) Publications 02-wp317, Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) at Iowa State University.
  2. Fabiosa, Jacinto F. & Beghin, John C. & DeCara, Stephane & Elobeid, Amani & Fang, Cheng & Isik, Murat & Matthey, Holger & Saak, Alexander, 2002. "Doha Round of the World Trade Organization and Agricultural Markets Liberalization: Impacts on Developing Economies, The," Staff General Research Papers 10056, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Aksoy, M. Ataman & Ng, Francis, 2010. "The evolution of agricultural trade flows," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5308, The World Bank.
  2. World Bank, 2003. "Global Economic Prospects 2004 : Realizing the Development Promise of the Doha Agenda," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 14782, August.
  3. Bureau, Jean-Christophe & Chakir, Raja & Gallezot, Jacques, 2006. "The Utilisation of EU and US Trade Preferences for Developing Countries in the Agri-Food Sector," Working Papers 18867, TRADEAG - Agricultural Trade Agreements.
  4. Susanto, Dwi & Rosson, C. Parr, III & Adcock, Flynn J., 2006. "Trade Creation and Trade Diversion in the North American Free Trade Agreement: The Case of Agricultural Sector," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21357, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  5. Scott McDonald & Cecilia Punt, 2004. "Trade Liberalisation, Efficiency and South Africa's Sugar Industry," Working Papers 2004012, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2004.
  6. Achterbosch, Thom J. & ben Hammouda, H. & Osakwe, Patrick N. & van Tongeren, Frank W., 2004. "Trade Liberalisation Under The Doha Development Agenda; Options And Consequences For Africa," Report Series 29104, Agricultural Economics Research Institute.
  7. Khorana, Sangeeta, 2008. "The Developmental Relevance of Tariff Rate Quotas as a Market Access Instrument: An Analysis of Swiss Agricultural Imports," Estey Centre Journal of International Law and Trade Policy, Estey Centre for Law and Economics in International Trade, vol. 9(2).
  8. Ernesto Zedillo & Patrick Messerlin & Julia Nielson, 2005. "Trade for Development. Achieving the Millennium Development Goals," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/8367, Sciences Po.
  9. John Asafu-Adjaye & Renuka Mahadevan, 2009. "Regional Trade Agreements versus Global Trade Liberalisation: Implications for a Small Island Developing State," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 32(3), pages 509-529, 03.
  10. Hoekman, Bernard & Michalopoulos, Constantine & Winters, L. alan, 2003. "More favorable and differential treatment of developing countries : toward a new approach in the World Trade Organization," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3107, The World Bank.
  11. Nyhodo, Bonani & Punt, Cecilia & Vink, Nick, 2009. "The potential impact of the Doha Development Agenda on the South African economy: liberalising OECD agriculture and food trade," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 48(1), March.
  12. Paul Schure & G. Cornelis van Kooten & Yichuan Wang, 2007. "Challenges for Less Developed Countries: Agricultural Policies in the EU and the US," Working Papers 2007-08, University of Victoria, Department of Economics, Resource Economics and Policy Analysis Research Group.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ias:cpaper:03-bp42. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: ().

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.