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The Dog ATE my Economics Homework! Estimates of the Average Effect of Treating Hawaii’s Public High School Students with Economics

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Author Info

  • Kimberly Burnett

    ()
    (University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization University of Hawaii-Manoa)

  • Sumner La Croix

    ()
    (Department of Economics University of Hawaii-Manoa)

Abstract

Hawaii is one of 27 states that do not require testing of public high school students regarding their understanding of economics. We report results for the first economics test administered to a large sample of students in Hawaii public high schools during the Spring 2004 semester. Our analysis focuses on evaluating the impact of a semester-long course in economics on student scores on a 20-question, multiple-choice economics test. We specify and estimate a regression analysis of exam scores that controls for other factors that could influence student performance on the exam. While student scores on the economics exam are relatively low, completion of an economics course and participation in a stock market simulation game each add about one point to student scores.

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File URL: http://www.uhero.hawaii.edu/assets/WP_2010-1.pdf
File Function: First version, 2010
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa in its series Working Papers with number 2010-01.

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Length: 14 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hae:wpaper:2010-01

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Postal: 2424 Maile Way, Social Sciences Building 542, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822
Fax: (808) 956-2889
Web page: http://www.uhero.hawaii.edu
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Keywords: economic education; high school economics; stock market simulation;

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  1. Moulton, Brent R, 1990. "An Illustration of a Pitfall in Estimating the Effects of Aggregate Variables on Micro Unit," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 334-38, May.
  2. Kimberly Burnett & Sumner La Croix, 2009. "Economic Education’s Roller Coaster Ride In Hawaii, 1956-2006," Working Papers 200901, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Department of Economics.
  3. Grimes, Paul W. & Millea, Meghan J. & Thomas, M. Kathleen, 2008. "District level mandates and high school students' understanding of economics," MPRA Paper 39883, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  4. William B. Walstad & Ken Rebeck, 2001. "Assessing the Economic Understanding of U.S. High School Students," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 452-457, May.
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