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Can transfer programs be made more nutrition sensitive?:

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  • Alderman, Harold

Abstract

Malnutrition can best be addressed by a combination of nutrition specific interventions and nutrition sensitive programs, including social protection. This study reviews mechanisms of transfer program in order to better design nutrition sensitive social protection. Social protection programs typically increase income as well as influence the timing and, to a degree, control of this income. Additionally, social protection programs may achieve further impact on nutrition by fostering linkages with health services or with sanitation programs, and specifically through activities that are related to nutrition education or micronutrient supplementation. This paper discusses what might be expected from such programs and reviews some of the evidence from specific transfer programs.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series IFPRI discussion papers with number 1342.

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Date of creation: 2014
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1342

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Keywords: food security; social policies; Nutrition; resilience; cash transfers; social protection; social safety nets;

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