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Does land tenure insecurity discourage tree planting?: evolution of customary land tenure and agroforestry management in Sumatra

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Author Info

  • Otsuka, Keijiro
  • Suyanto, S.
  • Tomich, Thomas P.

Abstract

It is widely believed that land tenure insecurity under a customary tenure system leads to socially inefficient resource allocation. This article demonstrates that land tenure insecurity promotes tree planting, which is inefficient from the private point of view but could be relatively efficient from the viewpoint of the global environment. Regression analysis, based on primary data collected in Sumatra, indicates that tenure insecurity in fact leads to early tree planting. It is also found that customary land tenure institutions have been evolving towards greater tenure security responding to increasing scarcity of land.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series EPTD discussion papers with number 31.

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Date of creation: 1997
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:eptddp:31

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Keywords: Land tenure.; Sumatra.; Tree planting.;

References

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  1. Anderson, Terry L & Hill, Peter J, 1990. "The Race for Property Rights," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 33(1), pages 177-97, April.
  2. Frank Place & Keijiro Otsuka, 2000. "Population Pressure, Land Tenure, and Tree Resource Management in Uganda," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 76(2), pages 233-251.
  3. Ault, David E & Rutman, Gilbert L, 1979. "The Development of Individual Rights to Property in Tribal Africa," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 163-82, April.
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Citations

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  1. Titling's reverse causal effects on the poor
    by Acumensch in Hyperborea on 2008-11-24 00:40:00
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Cited by:
  1. Philip Pardey & Julian Alston & Connie Chan-Kang & Eduardo Magalhães & Stephen Vosti, 2003. "Assessing and Attributing the Benefits from Varietal Improvement Research: Evidence from Embrapa, Brazil," Centre for International Economic Studies Working Papers, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies 2003-06, University of Adelaide, Centre for International Economic Studies.
  2. Smale, Melinda & Zambrano, Patricia & Falck-Zepeda, José & Gruère, Guillaume, 2006. "Parables: applied economics literature about the impact of genetically engineered crop varieties in developing economies," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 158, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Gruère, Guillaume & Giuliani, Alessandra & Smale, Melinda, 2006. "Marketing underutilized plant species for the benefit of the poor: a conceptual framework," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 154, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Gebremedhin, Berhanu & Swinton, Scott M., 2002. "Investment In Soil Conservation In Northern Ethiopia: The Role Of Land Tenure Security And Public Programs," Staff Papers, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics 11749, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  5. Nguyen, Trung Thanh & Bauer, Siegfried & Uibrig, Holm, 2010. "Land privatization and afforestation incentive of rural farms in the Northern Uplands of Vietnam," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 12(7), pages 518-526, September.
  6. Place, Frank & Otsuka, Keijiro, 1997. "Population, land tenure, and natural resource management: the case of customary land area in Malawi," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 27, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Gruère, Guillaume P., 2006. "An analysis of trade related international regulations of genetically modified food and their effects on developing countries:," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 147, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Linacre, Nicholas & Falck-Zepeda, José & Komen, John & MacLaren, Donald, 2006. "Risk assessment and management of genetically modified organisms under Australia's Gene Technology Act:," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 157, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  9. Di Falco, Salvatore & Chavas, Jean-Paul & Smale, Melinda, 2006. "Farmer management of production risk on degraded lands: the role of wheat genetic diversity in Tigray Region, Ethiopia," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 153, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Pender, John L., 1998. "Population growth, agricultural intensification, induced innovation and natural resource sustainability: An application of neoclassical growth theory," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, Blackwell, vol. 19(1-2), pages 99-112, September.
  11. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Payongayong, Ellen & Aidoo, J. B. & Otsuka, Keijiro, 1999. "Women's land rights in the transition to individualized ownership," FCND discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 58, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  12. Falck Zepeda, José & Barreto-Triana, Nancy & Baquero-Haeberlin, Irma & Espitia-Malagón, Eduardo & Fierro-Guzmán, Humberto & López, Nancy, 2006. "An exploration of the potential benefits of integrated pest management systems and the use of insect resistant potatoes to control the Guatemalan Tuber Moth (Tecia solanivora Povolny) in Ventaquemada,," EPTD discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 152, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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