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How amenities affect job and wage choices over the life cycle

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  • Ed Nosal
  • Peter Rupert

Abstract

The current wage at a job may not fully reflect the "value" of that job. For example, a job with a low starting wage may be preferred to one with a high starting wage if the growth rate of wages is higher in the former than in the latter. In fact, differences in wage growth can potentially explain why a worker might want to quit a high-paying job for one with a lower starting wage. Job amenities are another important factor that not only influences the value of a job but also provides an independent rationale for why workers change jobs. Including a job's amenities as part of its "value" can also generate a move from high-paying to low-paying jobs (or vice versa) as part of an optimal consumption plan over the life cycle. Both the direction of movement and the timing of a job change depend critically on the relationship between a worker's rate of time preference and the market interest rate.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland in its series Working Paper with number 0302.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fedcwp:0302

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Keywords: Job satisfaction ; Wages ; Employment (Economic theory);

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  1. Matthew S. Dey & Christopher J. Flinn, 2005. "An Equilibrium Model of Health Insurance Provision and Wage Determination," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 73(2), pages 571-627, 03.
  2. Hwang, Hae-shin & Mortensen, Dale T & Reed, W Robert, 1998. "Hedonic Wages and Labor Market Search," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(4), pages 815-47, October.
  3. Altonji, Joseph G & Paxson, Christina H, 1988. "Labor Supply Preferences, Hours Constraints, and Hours-Wage Trade-Offs," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 6(2), pages 254-76, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Per Krusell & Toshihiko Mukoyama & Richard Rogerson & Aysegul Sahin, 2008. "Aggregate Implications of Indivisible Labor, Incomplete Markets, and Labor Market Frictions," NBER Working Papers 13871, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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