Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The lack of affordable housing in New England: how big a problem?: why is it growing?: what are we doing about it?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Alicia Sasser
  • Bo Zhao
  • Darcy Rollins
  • Robert Tannenwald

Abstract

Although housing costs in greater Boston and elsewhere around the region have leveled off, affordable housing is still high on the public policy agenda in every New England state. A growing chorus of employers and policymakers are warning that the region's high cost of housing is now undermining its ability to attract and retain workers and businesses. This paper presents a thorough, region-wide analysis of the housing affordability problem in New England. We construct three affordability indicators to examine differences in the cost of housing across socioeconomic, demographic, and occupational groups, for every New England state and for the region's principal metropolitan areas.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.bostonfed.org/economic/neppc/wp/2006/neppcwp0601.htm
Download Restriction: no

File URL: http://www.bostonfed.org/economic/neppc/wp/2006/neppcwp0601.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Boston in its series New England Public Policy Center Working Paper with number 06-1.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbcw:06-1

Contact details of provider:
Postal: 600 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02210
Phone: 617-973-3397
Fax: 617-973-4221
Email:
Web page: http://www.bos.frb.org/
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: Housing - New England ; Housing - Prices ; Housing policy - New England;

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. John M. Quigley & Steven Raphael & Eugene Smolensky, 2001. "Homeless In America, Homeless In California," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 83(1), pages 37-51, February.
  2. Karl E. Case & Christopher J. Mayer, 1995. "Housing Price Dynamics Within a Metropolitan Area," NBER Working Papers 5182, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Edward L. Glaeser & Joseph Gyourko & Raven E. Saks, 2005. "Why Have Housing Prices Gone Up?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 2061, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  4. Mayer, Christopher J. & Somerville, C. Tsuriel, 2000. "Land use regulation and new construction," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 639-662, December.
  5. Richard J. Rosen, 2005. "Explaining recent changes in home prices," Chicago Fed Letter, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Jul.
  6. Alan Greenspan & James Kennedy, 2005. "Estimates of home mortgage originations, repayments, and debt on one-to-four-family residences," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2005-41, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  7. Karl E. Case & Robert J. Shiller, 2003. "Is There a Bubble in the Housing Market?," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 34(2), pages 299-362.
  8. Quigley, John M. & Raphael, Steven, 2004. "Is Housing Unaffordable? Why Isn't It More Affordable?," Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy, Working Paper Series qt1vp9j3k0, Berkeley Program on Housing and Urban Policy.
  9. Thorson, James A., 1997. "The Effect of Zoning on Housing Construction," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 6(1), pages 81-91, March.
  10. Joseph Gyourko & Christopher Mayer & Todd Sinai, 2006. "Superstar Cities," NBER Working Papers 12355, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Barakova, Irina & Bostic, Raphael W. & Calem, Paul S. & Wachter, Susan M., 2003. "Does credit quality matter for homeownership?," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 318-336, December.
  12. Green, Richard K., 1999. "Land Use Regulation and the Price of Housing in a Suburban Wisconsin County," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 144-159, June.
  13. Mayo, Stephen K., 1981. "Theory and estimation in the economics of housing demand," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 95-116, July.
  14. Charles Himmelberg & Christopher Mayer & Todd Sinai, 2005. "Assessing High House Prices: Bubbles, Fundamentals, and Misperceptions," NBER Working Papers 11643, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. John V. Duca, 2004. "How vulnerable are housing prices?," Southwest Economy, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Mar, pages 1, 11-16.
  16. C. Tsuriel Somerville & Christopher J. Mayer, 2003. "Government regulation and changes in the affordable housing stock," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jun, pages 45-62.
  17. Brueckner, Jan K. & Follain, James R., 1989. "ARMs and the demand for housing," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 163-187, May.
  18. Mayo, Stephen & Sheppard, Stephen, 2001. "Housing Supply and the Effects of Stochastic Development Control," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 109-128, June.
  19. Henry O. Pollakowski & Susan M. Wachter, 1990. "The Effects of Land-Use Constraints on Housing Prices," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 66(3), pages 315-324.
  20. Robert G. Lynch, 2003. "Estimates of Income and Income Inequality in the United States and in Each of the Fifty States: 1988-1999," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(3), pages 571-588.
  21. Rose, Louis A., 1989. "Urban land supply: Natural and contrived restrictions," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 325-345, May.
  22. Rose, Louis A., 1989. "Topographical constraints and urban land supply indexes," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 335-347, November.
  23. Stephen Malpezzi, 1994. "Housing Prices, Externalities, and Regulation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 94-08, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
  24. Irina Barakova & Raphael Bostic & Paul Calem & Susan Wachter, 2003. "Does Credit Quality Matter for Homeownership?," Working Paper 8608, USC Lusk Center for Real Estate.
  25. John F. Kain & John M. Quigley, 1975. "Determinants of Housing Expenditures," NBER Chapters, in: Housing Markets and Racial Discrimination: A Microeconomic Analysis, pages 154-189 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  26. Stephen Malpezzi & Richard K. Green, 1995. "What’s Happened to the Bottom of the Housing Market?," Wisconsin-Madison CULER working papers 95-16, University of Wisconsin Center for Urban Land Economic Research.
  27. Edward L. Glaeser & Joseph Gyourko, 2003. "The impact of building restrictions on housing affordability," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jun, pages 21-39.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Alicia Sasser Modestino & Julia Dennett, 2012. "Are American homeowners locked into their houses?: the impact of housing market conditions on state-to-state migration," Working Papers 12-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  2. Sasser, Alicia C., 2010. "Voting with their feet: Relative economic conditions and state migration patterns," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2-3), pages 122-135, May.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fip:fedbcw:06-1. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Catherine Spozio).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.