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Transitions In and Out of Unemployment Among Young People in the Irish Recession

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  • Kelly, Elish
  • McGuinness, Seamus
  • O'Connell, Philip J.
  • Haugh, David
  • Pandiella, Alberto González

Abstract

Young people have been hit hard by unemployment during the Irish recession. While much research has been undertaken to study the effects of the recession on overall labour market dynamics, little is known about the specific effects on youth unemployment and the associated challenges. This paper attempts to fill this gap by comparing the profile of transitions to work before the recession (2006) and as the economy emerged from the recession (2011). The results indicate that the rate of transition of the youth from unemployment to employment fell dramatically. The fall is not due to changes in the composition or the characteristics of the unemployed group but to changes in the external environment. These changes imply that the impact of certain individual characteristics changed over the course of the recession. In particular, for youth, education and nationality have become more important for finding a job in Ireland.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) in its series Papers with number WP466.

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Date of creation: Sep 2013
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Handle: RePEc:esr:wpaper:w466

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Keywords: education/employment/Ireland/labour market/Nationality/recession/unemployment;

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  1. Kelly, Elish & McGuinness, Seamus & O'Connell, Philip J., 2011. "Transitions to Long-Term Unemployment Risk Among Young People: Evidence from Ireland," Papers WP394, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  2. Juan J. Dolado & Marcel Jansen & Florentino Felgueroso & Andrés Fuentes & Anita Wölfl, 2013. "Youth Labour Market Performance in Spain and its Determinants: A Micro-Level Perspective," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1039, OECD Publishing.
  3. Ronald Bachmann & Mathias Sinning, 2012. "Decomposing the Ins and Outs of Cyclical Unemployment," ANU Working Papers in Economics and Econometrics 2012-571, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics.
  4. Henry S. Farber & Robert G. Valletta, 2013. "Do extended unemployment benefits lengthen unemployment spells? evidence from recent cycles in the U.S. labor market," Working Paper Series 2013-09, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  5. Farber, Henry & Valletta, Robert G., 2013. "Do Extended Unemployment Benefits Lengthen Unemployment Spells? Evidence from Recent Cycles in the U.S. Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 7347, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Gomes, Pedro Maia, 2010. "Labour Market Flows: Facts from the United Kingdom," IZA Discussion Papers 5327, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Duffy, David & Durkan, Joe & Timoney, Kevin & Casey, Eddie, 2013. "Quarterly Economic Commentary, Winter 2012," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number QEC20124, March.
  8. Henry S. Farber & Robert G. Valletta, 2013. "Do Extended Unemployment Benefits Lengthen Unemployment Spells? Evidence from Recent Cycles in the U.S. Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 19048, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Helen Russell & Philip J. O’Connell, 2004. "Women Returning to Employment, Education and Training in Ireland - An Analysis of Transitions," The Economic and Social Review, Economic and Social Studies, vol. 35(1), pages 1-25.
  10. Durkan, Joe & Duffy, David & O'Sullivan, Cormac, 2011. "Quarterly Economic Commentary, Summer 2011," Forecasting Report, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number QEC20112, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Conefrey, Thomas & McCarthy, Yvonne & Sherman, Martina, 2013. "Re-employment Probabilities for Unemployed Workers in Ireland," Economic Letters 06/EL/13, Central Bank of Ireland.

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