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Application possibilities of the micro-meso-macro framework in economic geography

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  • Heike Schroeder

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    Abstract

    The micro-meso-macro approach is an analytical framework to study processes of economic evolution. In economic geography it has been hardly taken up so far. Using the example of spatial implications of corporate processes of adaption and renewal after structural interruptions, this paper shows at a conceptual level how the framework could be applied to topics in economic geography. Compared to other approaches, the micro-meso-macro framework has several advantages: It allows to analyse the coevolution between different forms of knowledge in an economic system and the context in which companies operate. By integrating mechanism rules, it also considers the ability of firms to adapt to a changing environment. Furthermore, it is possible to explain the interplay between enterprises and higher levels of analysis like industry sectors or regions through the analytical unit of the rule trajectory. In this paper it is argued not to assign any spatial dimension to the different levels of analysis per se, but to examine the mechanism rules along trajectories of operational rules under a spatial perspective.

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    File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1115.pdf
    File Function: Version August 2011
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography in its series Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) with number 1115.

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    Length: 30 pages
    Date of creation: Aug 2011
    Date of revision: Aug 2011
    Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1115

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    Related research

    Keywords: evolutionary economic geography; analytical framework; rules; coevolution; meso level; corporate processes of renewal; structural interruptions;

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