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Theoretical advancement in economic geography by engaged pluralism

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  • Robert

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  • Claudia Klaerding

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    Abstract

    Economic geographers have recently been confronted with attempts to constitute a new paradigm of evolutionary economic geography. The paper aims at advancing theoretical economic geography by reviewing its core critique and proposed solutions, particularly that of integrating the perspective of a geographical political economy. Although we sympathize with the identified shortcomings of an evolutionary economic geography we criticise the alternative approach for being too narrow and reductionist. In contrast, a relational economic perspective is argued to theorize the core weaknesses of EEG, namely power, social agency and particularly the interrelatedness of influences on different scales, more comprehensively. By combining evolutionary and relational approaches in certain respects we, furthermore, plead for an advancement of theoretical economic geography by engaged pluralism.

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    File URL: http://econ.geo.uu.nl/peeg/peeg1202.pdf
    File Function: Version January 2012
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Utrecht University, Section of Economic Geography in its series Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) with number 1202.

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    Length: 32 pages
    Date of creation: Jan 2012
    Date of revision: Jan 2012
    Handle: RePEc:egu:wpaper:1202

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    Keywords: Evolutionary economic geography; sympathetic critique; relational perspective; engaged pluralism;

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    23. Erik Stam, 2006. "Why Butterflies Don’t Leave. Locational behaviour of entrepreneurial firms," Papers on Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy 2006-20, Max Planck Institute of Economics, Entrepreneurship, Growth and Public Policy Group.
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