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Cost of Holding Excess Reserves - The Indian Experience

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  • Abhijit Sen Gupta

    (Indian Council for Research on International Economic Relations)

Abstract

Most of the existing literature has used single reserve adequacy measures to evaluate the volume of excess reserves. In this paper, we employ empirical methods to generate a comprehensive reserve adequacy measure, incorporating the various objectives of holding reserves, and compare the actual reserve accumulation experience of various emerging markets with the prediction of our empirical model. Using this comprehensive reserve adequacy measure, we calculate the cost of holding excess reserves for India by looking at three different alternative uses of resources. We find that India is foregoing asmuch as 2% of its GDP by accumulating reserves instead of employing resources in alternative uses.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by East Asian Bureau of Economic Research in its series Finance Working Papers with number 22165.

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Date of creation: Jan 2008
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Handle: RePEc:eab:financ:22165

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Keywords: Reserve Holdings; Reserve Management;

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  1. Michael Dooley & David Folkerts-Landau & Peter Garber, 2005. "An essay on the revived Bretton Woods system," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Feb.
  2. Joshua Aizenman & Yeonho Lee & Yeongseop Rhee, 2004. "International Reserves Management and Capital Mobility in a Volatile World: Policy Considerations and a Case Study of Korea," NBER Working Papers 10534, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Douglas Gollin, 2001. "Getting Income Shares Right," Department of Economics Working Papers 2001-11, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  4. Christopher J. Neely, 2000. "Are changes in foreign exchange reserves well correlated with official intervention?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 17-32.
  5. Aghion, Philippe & Bacchetta, Philippe & Rancière, Romain & Rogoff, Kenneth, 2006. "Exchange Rate Volatility and Productivity Growth: The Role of Financial Development," CEPR Discussion Papers 5629, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Carmen M. Reinhart & Kenneth S. Rogoff, 2002. "The Modern History of Exchange Rate Arrangements: A Reinterpretation," NBER Working Papers 8963, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Chinn, Menzie D. & Ito, Hiro, 2006. "What matters for financial development? Capital controls, institutions, and interactions," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(1), pages 163-192, October.
  8. Kletzer, Kenneth, 2004. "Liberalizing Capital Flows in India: Financial Repression, Macroeconomic Policy and Gradual Reforms," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt3kj2w649, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  9. Kletzer, Kenneth, 2004. "Liberalizing Capital Flows in India: Financial Repression, Macroeconomic Policy and Gradual Reforms," Santa Cruz Center for International Economics, Working Paper Series qt3kj2w649, Center for International Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
  10. Ila Patnaik, 2004. "India's Experience with a Pegged Exchange Rate," India Policy Forum, Global Economy and Development Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 1(1), pages 189-226.
  11. Kletzer, Kenneth, 2004. "Liberalizing Capital Flows in India: Financial Repression, Macroeconomic Policy and Gradual Reforms," Santa Cruz Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt9h27k0ff, Department of Economics, UC Santa Cruz.
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Cited by:
  1. Ghosal, Sayantan & Thampanishvong, Kannika, 2009. "Does strengthening Collective Action Clauses (CACs) help?," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 895, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.

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