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International Remittances and Household Expenditures : The Philippine Case

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  • Aubrey D. Tabuga

    (PIDS)

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    Abstract

    This paper examines the general relationship between remittances and household expenditures in the Philippines by doing a cross-sectional analysis of the 2003 Family Income and Expenditure Survey (FIES). Unlike past research works, it provides a comprehensive overview of the effect of remittance on spending behavior by looking not only at common categories like food, education, and housing but also vices like tobacco and alcohol. It addressed some methodological issues in examining remittance effects. These are the presence of zero expenditures, heterogeneity of the nationally representative sample, and inaccuracy of the FIES data on remittance. Zero expenditures were taken into account by using the censored Tobit model while heterogeneity was addressed by employing the Quantile Regression technique. Also, the FIES data on remittances was corrected by excluding the investment and pension components from the original remittance data used by past studies to arrive at more accurate estimate of remittances sent by family members working abroad and its effects. The study found that while there are evidences that households receiving remittances tend to consume more conspicuously on consumer items, they also invest more on education, housing, medical care and durable goods. There is no clear relationship though between remittances and tobacco and alcohol.

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    File URL: http://www.eaber.org/node/22698
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by East Asian Bureau of Economic Research in its series Development Economics Working Papers with number 22698.

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    Date of creation: Jan 2007
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    Handle: RePEc:eab:develo:22698

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    Related research

    Keywords: remittances; remittance income effect; household expenditures/spending; quantile regression analysis;

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    References

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    1. Adams, Richard H. Jr., 2005. "Remittances, household expenditure and investment in Guatemala," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3532, The World Bank.
    2. Roger Koenker & Kevin F. Hallock, 2001. "Quantile Regression," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 15(4), pages 143-156, Fall.
    3. Edgard R. Rodriguez & Susan Horton, 1995. "International Return Migration and Remittances in the Philippines," Working Papers horton-95-01, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
    4. Omar Arias & Kevin F. Hallock & Walter Sosa Escudero, 1999. "Individual Heterogeneity in the Returns to Schooling: Instrumental Variables Quantile Regression using Twins Data," Department of Economics, Working Papers 016, Departamento de Economía, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    5. Lina Cardona Sosa & Carlos Medina, 2006. "Migration as a Safety Net and Effects of Remittances on Household Consumption: The Case of Colombia," BORRADORES DE ECONOMIA 003219, BANCO DE LA REPÚBLICA.
    6. Yannis Bilias & Roger Koenker, 2001. "Quantile regression for duration data: A reappraisal of the Pennsylvania Reemployment Bonus Experiments," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 199-220.
    7. Yang, Dean, 2005. "International migration, human capital, and entrepreneurship : evidence from Philippine migrants'exchange rate shocks," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3578, The World Bank.
    8. Robert Burgess & V. Haksar, 2005. "Migration and Foreign Remittances in the Philippines," IMF Working Papers 05/111, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Shefrin, Hersh M & Thaler, Richard H, 1988. "The Behavioral Life-Cycle Hypothesis," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 26(4), pages 609-43, October.
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    Cited by:
    1. James Ted McDonald & M. Rebecca Valenzuela, 2009. "The Impact of Skill Mismatch among Migrants on Remittance Behaviour," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 242, McMaster University.
    2. Barrios, Erniel B. & Mina, Christian D., 2009. "Profiling Poverty with Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines," Discussion Papers DP 2009-29, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.

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