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Which Countries Export FDI, and How Much?

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  • Razin, Assaf
  • Rubinstein, Yona
  • Sadka, Efraim

Abstract

The Paper provides a reconciliation of Lucas’ paradox, based on fixed setup costs of new investments. With such costs, it does not pay a firm to make a ‘small’ investment, even though such an investment is called for by marginal productivity conditions. Using a sample of 45 developed and developing countries we estimate jointly the participation equation (the decision whether to invest at all) and the FDI flow equation (the decision how much to invest). We find that countries which are more likely to serve as source for FDI exports than their characteristics project export lower flow of FDI than is predicted by their characteristics. This negative correlation suggests that the source countries with relatively low setup costs are also those with high marginal productivity of capital.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 4204.

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Date of creation: Jan 2004
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4204

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Keywords: Foreign Direct Investment;

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  1. Roberts, Mark J. & Tybout, James R., 1991. "Size rationalization and trade exposure in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 594, The World Bank.
  2. Fernando Broner & Guido Lorenzoni & Sergio Schmuckler, 2006. "Why Do Emerging Economies Borrow Short Term?," 2006 Meeting Papers 841, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  3. Maurice Obstfeld & Alan M. Taylor, 2002. "Globalization and Capital Markets," NBER Working Papers 8846, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Smarzynska, Beata K., 2001. "Pollution havens and foreign direct investment : dirty secret or popular myth?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2673, The World Bank.
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  6. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1990. "Why Doesn't Capital Flow from Rich to Poor Countries?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 92-96, May.
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  8. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
  9. Assaf Razin & Ashoka Mody & Efraim Sadka, 2003. "The Role of Information in Driving FDI Flows," IMF Working Papers 03/148, International Monetary Fund.
  10. Marc J. Melitz, 2003. "The Impact of Trade on Intra-Industry Reallocations and Aggregate Industry Productivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 71(6), pages 1695-1725, November.
  11. Barry Eichengreen & Douglas A. Irwin, 1996. "The Role of History in Bilateral Trade Flows," NBER Working Papers 5565, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Amiti, Mary, 1998. "Inter-industry trade in manufactures: Does country size matter?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 231-255, April.
  13. Loungani, Prakash & Mody, Ashoka & Razin, Assaf, 2002. "The Global Disconnect: The Role of Transactional Distance and Scale Economies in Gravity Equations," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(5), pages 526-43, December.
  14. J. M. C. Santos Silva & Silvana Tenreyro, 2003. "Gravity-defying trade," Working Papers 03-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  15. Ashoka Mody & Assaf Razin & Efraim Sadka, 2003. "The Role of Information in Driving FDI Flows: Host-Country Tranparency and Source Country Specialization," NBER Working Papers 9662, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  16. David L. Carr & James R. Markusen & Keith E. Maskus, 1998. "Estimating the Knowledge-Capital Model of the Multinational Enterprise," NBER Working Papers 6773, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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