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The Political Economy of Education and Development in an Open Economy

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  • Bourguignon, François
  • Verdier, Thierry

Abstract

If the price effect of opening up a developing economy may be expected to act as a disincentive for investment in human capital, the opposite is likely to be true of the income effect, especially in the presence of credit market imperfections among the poor. It is shown in this Paper that this may not be the case anymore in a society initially dominated by an oligarchic capitalist elite that is afraid of losing its political control in favour of an educated middle class. Although it may sometimes be in its interest to democratize by subsidizing education when the economy is closed, incentives to do so disappear when the economy is open to trade or factor flows.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 3075.

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Date of creation: Nov 2001
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:3075

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Keywords: education; globalization; political economy;

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Cited by:
  1. B.P. Zaaruka & J.W. Fedderke, 2011. "Indicators of Political and Economic Institutions in Tanzania: 1884 - 2008," Working Papers 231, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  2. Rubén Segura-Cayuela, 2006. "Inefficient policies, inefficient institutions and trade," Banco de Espa�a Working Papers 0633, Banco de Espa�a.
  3. Chakrabarty Debajyoti & Chanda Areendam & Ghate Chetan, 2006. "Education, Growth, and Redistribution in the Presence of Capital Flight," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 6(2), pages 1-41, November.
  4. Thierry Verdier, 2005. "Intégration commerciale « socialement responsable » : une approche en termes d'économie politique," Revue d’économie du développement, De Boeck Université, vol. 19(4), pages 55-121.
  5. Ramin Dadasov & Philipp Harms & Oliver Lorz, 2010. "Financial Integration in Autocracies: Greasing the Wheel or More to Steal?," FIW Working Paper series 048, FIW.
  6. Åsa Johansson & Yvan Guillemette & Fabrice Murtin & David Turner & Giuseppe Nicoletti & Christine de la Maisonneuve & Philip Bagnoli & Guillaume Bousquet & Francesca Spinelli, 2013. "Long-Term Growth Scenarios," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1000, OECD Publishing.

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