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Upstream Intergenerational Transfers

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Author Info

  • Sloan, F.A.
  • Zhang, H.H.

Abstract

This study analyzes upstream intergenerational transfers from middle-aged children to their elderly parents. We formulate a model in which the middle-aged child transfers both money and time to an elderly parent based on an altruistic motive. We examine substitution between financial transfers and time transfers using data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS). Empirical results support the assumption that upstream transfers are motivated by altruism, particularly financial transfers. Parents financially worse off than their middle-aged children receive more money. They are more likely to live nearby if not coresident. Overall, the results for time transfers provide weaker support for our model than financial transfers. A child with a high wage tends to transfer money rather than time, suggesting that the two types of transfers are partial substitutes.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business in its series GSIA Working Papers with number 1995-27.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: 1995
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:cmu:gsiawp:1995-27

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Postal: Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
Web page: http://www.tepper.cmu.edu/

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Web: http://student-3k.tepper.cmu.edu/gsiadoc/GSIA_WP.asp

Related research

Keywords: AGING; YOUTH; GENERATIONS;

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Cited by:
  1. Pierre Pestieau & Motohiro Sato, 2008. "Long-Term Care: the State, the Market and the Family," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 75(299), pages 435-454, 08.
  2. Olena Nizalova, 2012. "The Wage Elasticity of Informal Care Supply: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study," Southern Economic Journal, Southern Economic Association, vol. 79(2), pages 350-366, October.
  3. Cinzia Di Novi & Elenka Brenna, 2013. "Is caring for elderly parents detrimental for women’s mental health? The influence of the European North-South gradient," Working Papers 2013:23, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  4. Rob Alessie & Viola Angelini & Giacomo Pasini, 2014. "Is It True Love? Altruism Versus Exchange in Time and Money Transfers," De Economist, Springer, vol. 162(2), pages 193-213, June.
  5. Paula C. Albuquerque, 2014. "The Interaction of Private Intergenerational Transfers Types," Working Papers Department of Economics 2014/03, ISEG - School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, University of Lisbon.
  6. HwaJung Choi, 2011. "Parents’ Health and Adult Children’s Subsequent Working Status: A Perspective of Intergenerational Transfer and Time Allocation," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 32(3), pages 493-507, September.
  7. CREMER, Helmuth & PESTIEAU, Pierre & PONTHIERE, Grégory, 2012. "The economics of long-term care: a survey," CORE Discussion Papers 2012030, Université catholique de Louvain, Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE).
  8. Sergi Jiménez-Martín & Cristina Vilaplana Prieto, 2013. "Informal Care and intergenerational transfers in European Countries," Working Papers 2013-25, FEDEA.
  9. Alessandro Cigno & Gianna Giannelli & Furio Rosati & Daniela Vuri, 2006. "Is there such a thing as a family constitution? A test based on credit rationing," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 4(3), pages 183-204, 09.
  10. Jinkook Lee & Hyungsoo Kim, 2008. "A longitudinal analysis of the impact of health shocks on the wealth of elders," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 217-230, January.
  11. François-Charles Wolff & Manon Domingues Dos Santos, 2010. "Pourquoi les immigrés portugais veulent-ils tant retourner au pays ?," Économie et Prévision, Programme National Persée, vol. 195(4), pages 1-14.
  12. Yang-Ming Chang, 2009. "Strategic altruistic transfers and rent seeking within the family," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 22(4), pages 1081-1098, October.
  13. Ana Fernandes, 2011. "Altruism, labor supply and redistributive neutrality," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 24(4), pages 1443-1469, October.
  14. Wolff, François-Charles, 2006. "Les transferts ascendants au Bangladesh, une décision familiale?," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 82(1), pages 271-316, mars-juin.

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