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Investor Inattention and the Market Impact of Summary Statistics

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  • Thomas Gilbert
  • Shimon Kogan
  • Lars Lochstoer
  • Ataman Ozyildirim

Abstract

Investors with limited attention have an incentive to focus on summary statistics rather than individual pieces of information. We use this observation to form a test of the impact of limited attention on the aggregate stock market. We examine the market response to a macroeconomic release that is purely a summary statistic, the U.S. Leading Economic Index (LEI). Consistent with the limited attention hypothesis, we show that the LEI announcement has an impact on aggregate stock returns, return volatility, and trading volume. Furthermore, we find evidence that the response to the LEI is higher for stocks which inattentive investors are more likely to trade.

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File URL: https://student-3k.tepper.cmu.edu/gsiadoc/wp/2006-E24.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business in its series GSIA Working Papers with number 2006-E24.

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Date of creation: Nov 2007
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Handle: RePEc:cmu:gsiawp:197052381

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Postal: Tepper School of Business, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-3890
Web page: http://www.tepper.cmu.edu/

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Web: http://student-3k.tepper.cmu.edu/gsiadoc/GSIA_WP.asp

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Cited by:
  1. Peter Koudijs, 2013. "The boats that did not sail: Asset Price Volatility and Market Efficiency in a Natural Experiment," NBER Working Papers 18831, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Palomino, Frederic & Renneboog, Luc & Zhang, Chendi, 2009. "Information salience, investor sentiment, and stock returns: The case of British soccer betting," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 15(3), pages 368-387, June.
  3. Schmöller, Arno, 2010. "Bidding Behavior, Seller Strategies, and the Utilization of Information in Auctions for Complex Goods," Munich Dissertations in Economics 11175, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  4. Sofía B. Ramos & Helena Veiga & Pedro Latoeiro, 2013. "Predictability of stock market activity using Google search queries," Statistics and Econometrics Working Papers ws130605, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Estadística y Econometría.
  5. Stefano Giglio & Kelly Shue, 2013. "No News is News: Do Markets Underreact to Nothing?," NBER Working Papers 18914, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Thoenes, Stefan & Gores, Timo, 2012. "Attention, Media and Fuel Efficiency," EWI Working Papers 2012-11, Energiewirtschaftliches Institut an der Universitaet zu Koeln.
  7. Sadique, Shibley & In, Francis & Veeraraghavan, Madhu & Wachtel, Paul, 2013. "Soft information and economic activity: Evidence from the Beige Book," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 81-92.

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