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Exploring the impact of public services on quality of life indicators

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Author Info

  • Adriana Castelli

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York, UK)

  • Rowena Jacobs

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York, UK)

  • Maria Goddard

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York, UK)

  • Peter C Smith

    (Centre for Health Economics, University of York, UK)

Abstract

The fundamental aim of public services is to improve the quality of life of citizens. The main objective of this study was to investigate the influence of public service organisations (PSOs) on aspects of quality of life (broadly measured) of citizens at a local level. We assembled a rich database using 20 of the 45 quality of life measures developed by the Audit Commission. Those we selected covered broad areas of quality of life such as safety, housing, health, education, and transport and were available at ‘small area’ level. We used a range of advanced statistical methods to analyse the relationships between PSOs and quality of life measures at different hierarchical levels. The techniques were selected to be robust when making comparisons between levels and when looking at associations between quality of life measures. Our descriptive analyses (bivariate correlations, factor analysis and ANOVA) suggested overall some significant correlations between some of the quality of life variables. The SUR model results also indicated that the quality of life indicators are correlated, and therefore that we should look at these measures in a joint modelling approach such as MVML, as envisaged in the study objectives.

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File URL: http://www.york.ac.uk/media/che/documents/papers/researchpapers/rp46_exploring_the_impact_of_public_services_on_quality_of_life_indicators.pdf
File Function: First version, 2009
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Centre for Health Economics, University of York in its series Working Papers with number 046cherp.

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Length: 148 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:chy:respap:46cherp

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  1. Smith, Dylan M. & Brown, Stephanie L. & Ubel, Peter A., 2008. "Are subjective well-being measures any better than decision utility measures?," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(01), pages 85-91, January.
  2. Hausman, Daniel M., 2008. "Valuing health properly," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(01), pages 79-83, January.
  3. Dolan, Paul & Peasgood, Tessa & White, Mathew, 2008. "Do we really know what makes us happy A review of the economic literature on the factors associated with subjective well-being," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 94-122, February.
  4. Scheffler, Richard M. & Brown, Timothy T., 2008. "Social capital, economics, and health: new evidence," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(04), pages 321-331, October.
  5. Daniel Kahneman & Alan B. Krueger, 2006. "Developments in the Measurement of Subjective Well-Being," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 3-24, Winter.
  6. Andrew E. Clark & Paul Frijters & Michael A. Shields, 2008. "Relative Income, Happiness, and Utility: An Explanation for the Easterlin Paradox and Other Puzzles," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(1), pages 95-144, March.
  7. Routledge, Bryan R. & von Amsberg, Joachim, 2003. "Social capital and growth," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 167-193, January.
  8. S. Illeris & G. Akehurst, 2002. "Introduction," The Service Industries Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(1), pages 1-3, January.
  9. Costa-Font, Joan & Mladovsky, Philipa, 2008. "Social capital and the social formation of health-related preferences and behaviours," Health Economics, Policy and Law, Cambridge University Press, vol. 3(04), pages 413-427, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Castelli, Adriana & Jacobs, Rowena & Goddard, Maria & Smith, Peter C., 2013. "Health, policy and geography: Insights from a multi-level modelling approach," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 61-73.
  2. Watson, Dorothy, 2011. "Quality of Public Services: Irish Public Perceptions and Implications for Renewal," Papers EC6, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).

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